PLoS Biology

PLoS Biology is a peer-reviewed scientific journal covering all aspects of biology. Publication began on October 13, 2003. It was the first journal of the Public Library of Science. All content in PLoS Biology is published under the Creative Commons "by-attribution" license. To fund the journal, the publication s business model requires that, in most cases, authors will pay publication costs. In addition to research articles, PLoS Biology publishes online e-letters in which readers provide comments on articles. According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2009 impact factor of 12.916, ranking it first in the category Biology . Mike Taylor of Discover Magazine said in 2012 that while PLoS Biology has a high impact factor, "PLoS has de-emphasized this traditional, problematic measure, so you won’t find this fact blazoned across their website." The current editor-in-chief is Jonathan Eisen (University of California, Davis). Due to their free licensing, files from PLoS Biology can be reused in places other than the original article, e.g. to illustrate Wikipedia articles.

Publisher
Public Library of Science
History
2003–present
Impact factor
12.916 (2009)

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Medical research

Bone marrow may be the missing piece of the fertility puzzle

A woman's bone marrow may determine her ability to start and sustain a pregnancy, report Yale researchers in PLOS Biology. The study shows that when an egg is fertilized, stem cells leave the bone marrow and travel via the ...

Neuroscience

How texture deceives the moving finger

The perceived speed of a surface moving across the skin depends on texture, with some textures fooling us into thinking that an object is moving faster than it is, according to a study published August 27 in the open-access ...

Medical research

A new pathway for an anti-aging drug

In 1972, Easter Island, called Rapa Nui, famous for its moai statues, offered a new wonder: the discovery of the drug rapamycin.

Genetics

What can be done to prevent another CRISPR crisis?

The public announcement last fall from China regarding gene editing on human embryos, conducted without the benefit of scientific review or ethical debate, was met with worldwide disdain. It also has raised global concerns ...

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