PLoS ONE

PLoS ONE is an open access peer-reviewed scientific journal published by the Public Library of Science (PLoS) since 2006. It covers primary research from any discipline within science and medicine. All submissions go through an internal and external pre-publication peer review but are not excluded on the basis of lack of perceived importance or adherence to a scientific field. The PLoS ONE online platform has post-publication user discussion and rating features. PLoS ONE was launched in December 2006 as a beta version. It launched with Commenting and Note making functionality, and added the ability to rate articles in July 2007. In September 2007 the ability to leave "trackbacks" on articles was added. In August 2008 it moved from a weekly publication schedule to a daily one, publishing articles as soon as they became ready. In October 2008 PLoS ONE came out of "beta". Also in September 2009, as part of its "Article-Level Metrics" program, PLoS ONE made the full online usage data for every published article (HTML page views, PDF, and XML downloads) publicly available. In 2006, the journal published 138 articles; in 2007, it published just over 1,200 articles; and in 2008, it

Publisher
Public Library of Science
History
2006--present
Impact factor
4.411 (2010)
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Clue to how cancer cells spread

In a second human case, a Yale-led research team has found that a melanoma cell and a white blood cell can fuse to form a hybrid with the ability to metastasize. The finding provides further insight into how melanoma and ...

Jan 27, 2017
popularity85 comments 0

Is transgender identity inherited?

The recent return of the "which bathroom?" issue regarding transgender individuals' use of public restrooms has made me think about how I've handled sex and gender in my human genetics textbook. Over the editions, the two ...

Mar 03, 2017
popularity1 comments 2

Gut bacteria have own circadian clock

The circadian rhythm, or circadian clock, is an internal mechanism that drives the 24-hour cycles that tell our bodies when to sleep, wake and eat — and now, new research has found that bacteria living within the gut ...

Aug 08, 2016
popularity384 comments 2

Omega-3 fatty acid stops known trigger of lupus

A team of Michigan State University researchers has found that consuming an omega-3 fatty acid called DHA, or docosahexaenoic acid, can stop a known trigger of lupus and potentially other autoimmune disorders.

Sep 29, 2016
popularity348 comments 0