Population and Development Review

Population and Development Review is essential reading to keep abreast of population studies, the relationships between population and social, economic, and environmental change, and related thinking on public policy. Its interests span both developed and developing countries, theoretical advances as well as empirical analyses and case studies, a broad range of disciplinary approaches, and concern with historical as well as present-day problems. It maintains a high level of readability, not sacrificing scholarship but focusing on ideas and insights rather than analytical technicalities. Through its commentaries, review essays, book reviews, and excerpts of prescient writings from the past, it contributes to the liveliness and critical depth of its field. An appreciative readership and strong citation counts attest to its value.

Impact factor
2.224 (2011)

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Health

Study reveals surprising truths about caregivers

Caregiving is a part of daily life for millions of Americans, particularly the so-called sandwich generation balancing the needs of aging parents with looking after their own children.

Health

Who takes care of whom? Surprising new evidence

There has been much recent discussion in the press of the plight of the so-called "sandwich generation," that is, adults who are responsible for the care of children as well as aging parents. The need for simultaneous childcare ...

Health

Children of older mothers do better

Children of older mothers are healthier, taller and obtain more education than the children of younger mothers. The reason is that in industrialized countries educational opportunities are increasing, and people are getting ...

Health

Education, not income, the best predictor of a long life

Rising income and the subsequent improved standards of living have long been thought to be the most important factors contributing to a long and healthy life. However, new research from Wolfgang Lutz and Endale Kebede, from ...

Health

In aging, one size does not fit all

Conventional measures of age usually define people as 'old' at one chronological age, often 65. In many countries around the world, age 65 is used as a cutoff for everything from pension age to health care systems, as the ...

Health

New study finds flaws in mortality projections

A new study by demographer John Bongaarts, Population Council Vice President and Distinguished Scholar, has found that mortality projections from most low-mortality countries are more pessimistic than they should be. The ...

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