Psycho-Oncology

Psycho-Oncology is concerned with the psychological, social, behavioral, and ethical aspects of cancer. This subspeciality addresses the two major psychological dimensions of cancer: the psychological responses of patients to cancer at all stages of the disease, and that of their families and caretakers; and the psychological, behavioral and social factors that may influence the disease process. Psycho-oncology is an area of multi-disciplinary interest and has boundaries with the major specialities in oncology: the clinical disciplines (surgery, medicine, pediatrics, radiotherapy), epidemiology, immunology, endocrinology, biology, pathology, bioethics, palliative care, rehabilitation medicine, clinical trials research and decision making, as well as psychiatry and psychology.

Publisher
Wiley
Website
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1099-1611
Impact factor
3.339 (2011)

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Oncology & Cancer

Certain factors linked with discontinuing breast cancer therapy

For women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer, long-term endocrine therapy can greatly reduce the risk of recurrence. Many women, especially those in underserved populations, do not continue treatment, however. A ...

Oncology & Cancer

Cancer patients with obesity show poorer psychosocial health

(HealthDay)—Patients with breast or prostate cancer who are obese score higher in psychosocial problem-related distress than nonobese patients, according to a study recently published in Psycho-Oncology.

Oncology & Cancer

Ethnic minority women face more barriers to seeing their GP

The study published in Psycho-Oncology found that, in England, women from ethnic minority backgrounds were more likely to feel too embarrassed to talk to a GP (75-91%) than white women (8%). Being too scared that a symptom ...

Oncology & Cancer

The impact of infertility on cancer patients

New research led by Western Sydney University has revealed that infertility—one of the most distressing long-term effects of cancer treatment—is often overlooked in advising patients about treatment, and in understanding ...

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