Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience

SCAN will consider research that uses neuroimaging (fMRI, MRI, PET, EEG, MEG), neuropsychological patient studies, animal lesion studies, single-cell recording, pharmacological perturbation, and transcranial magnetic stimulation. SCAN will also consider submissions that examine the mediational role of neural processes in linking social phenomena to physiological, neuroendocrine, immunological, developmental, and genetic processes. Additionally, SCAN will publish papers that address issues of mental and physical health as they relate to social and affective processes (e.g., autism, anxiety disorders, depression, stress, effects of child rearing) as long as cognitive neuroscience methods are used.

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Website
http://scan.oxfordjournals.org/
Impact factor
6.132 (2011)

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Psychology & Psychiatry

Mine or ours: The brain's choice

Researchers from HSE University have shown how the brain works differently depending on whether a subject is dealing with common (shared) or private natural resources. The ventral striatum—the so-called pleasure center—plays ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

How toddler-mother attachment impacts adolescent brain and behavior

Interpersonal trust is a crucial component of healthy relationships. When we interact with strangers, we quickly gage whether we can trust them. And those important social skills may be shaped by our earliest relationship ...

Neuroscience

Moral disgust leaves us with a 'bad taste'

When we witness behaviors that violate shared moral norms, our brain inhibits the neurons that control our tongue movements—just as it does when something tastes bad. An international research group led by the Universities ...

Neuroscience

How do parents' brains react to feedback about their child?

Parents appear to be extremely sensitive to feedback they receive about their child. Just how sensitive depends on the ('rose-tinted') glasses through which they look at their child. All this can be seen in the brain. Neuroscientist ...

Neuroscience

How the brain helps us navigate social differences

Our brain responds differently if we talk to a person of a different socioeconomic background from our own compared to when we speak to someone whose background is similar, according to a new imaging study by UCL and Yale ...

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