Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience

SCAN will consider research that uses neuroimaging (fMRI, MRI, PET, EEG, MEG), neuropsychological patient studies, animal lesion studies, single-cell recording, pharmacological perturbation, and transcranial magnetic stimulation. SCAN will also consider submissions that examine the mediational role of neural processes in linking social phenomena to physiological, neuroendocrine, immunological, developmental, and genetic processes. Additionally, SCAN will publish papers that address issues of mental and physical health as they relate to social and affective processes (e.g., autism, anxiety disorders, depression, stress, effects of child rearing) as long as cognitive neuroscience methods are used.

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Impact factor
6.132 (2011)

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Neuroscience

How procrastinators and doers differ genetically

Some people tend to postpone actions. In women, this trait is associated with a genetic predisposition toward a higher level of dopamine in the brain. This is what researchers from Ruhr-Universität Bochum and the Technical ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Early childhood stress affects brain's response to rewards

A Duke University-led study has pinpointed how early childhood stress affects the adult brain's response to rewards. Their findings suggest a possible pathway by which childhood stress may increase risk of depression and ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Research that is simply beyond belief

New research involving a psychologist from the University of York has revealed for the first time that both belief in God and prejudice towards immigrants can be reduced by directing magnetic energy into the brain.

Neuroscience

When punishment doesn't fit the crime

New research finds people with traumatic brain injuries (TBI) —such as those incurred from violent accidents or combat—are more prone to misjudge when faced with situations involving dispute or requiring discipline.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Brain structure reveals ability to regulate emotions

We all vary in how often we become happy, sad or angry, and also in how strongly these emotions are expressed. This variability is a part of our personality and can be seen as a positive aspect that increases diversity in ...

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