Social Psychological and Personality Science

Social Psychological and Personality Science is a peer-reviewed academic journal that publishes papers four times a year in the field of Psychology. The journal s editor is Vincent Y. A. Yzerbyt (Catholic University of Louvain). It has been in publication since 2010 and is currently published by SAGE Publications. The journal is jointly owned by four different societies: Association for Research in Personality, European Association of Experimental Social Psychology, Society of Experimental and Social Psychology and Society for Personality and Social Psychology. Social Psychological and Personality Science seeks to provide a resource for scholars in social and personality psychology. The quarterly journal publishes reports of both practical and theoretical based research across a range of disciplines. Social Psychological and Personality Science aims to provide a platform for the presentation of new research and also for the discussion and dissemination of case reports. Social Psychological and Personality Science is abstracted and indexed in the following databases:

Publisher
SAGE Publications
History
2010-present
Website
http://www.uk.sagepub.com/journals/Journal201952?siteId=sage-uk&prodTypes=any&q=Social+Psychological+and+Personality+Science&fs=1

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Psychology & Psychiatry

Aiming for an enduring relationship

Are you ready for love? It's an age-old question that has inspired pop songs and romantic literature, as well as fuelling advice columns in celebrity magazines. But will your love endure, or is it just a fling?

Psychology & Psychiatry

I, you, or we: Pronouns provide hints to romantic attachment styles

Sometimes people wish they had greater insight into how their partner really feels. Recent work in social and personality psychology dives into the stories people tell about their romantic relationships, and finds that those ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Study busts myths about gossip

A new UC Riverside study asserts that women don't engage in "tear-down" gossip any more than men, and lower income people don't gossip more than their more well-to-do counterparts. It also holds younger people are more likely ...

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