Trends in Cognitive Sciences

Essential reading for those working directly in the cognitive sciences or in related specialist areas, Trends in Cognitive Sciences provides an instant overview of current thinking for scientists, students and teachers who want to keep up with the latest developments in the cognitive sciences. The journal brings together research in psychology, artificial intelligence, linguistics, philosophy, computer science and neuroscience. Trends in Cognitive Sciences provides a platform for the interaction of these disciplines and the evolution of cognitive science as an independent field of study.

Publisher
Cell Press
Website
http://www.cell.com/trends/cognitive-sciences/home

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Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Hitting the reset button: Building a better normal after the pandemic

With the end of the pandemic in sight and a longing to return to some resemblance of normalcy, Stanford psychologist Jamil Zaki thinks the harrowing experience of the past year is a unique opportunity to reset people's expectations ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Human intelligence just got less mysterious, neuroscientist says

Neuroscience experts from the University of Leicester have released research that breaks with the past 50 years of neuroscientific opinion, arguing that the way we store memories is key to making human intelligence superior ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Nudges fail more often than is reported, experts warn

Research led by Queen Mary University of London has shown that despite the widespread use of behavioral interventions across society, failed interventions are surprisingly common.

Neuroscience

Study offers new insight into brain connectivity

A new framework for understanding changes in the brain's activity and connections, which has implications for how to best model the mechanisms of disease in the brain, has been developed by Georgia State University researchers ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

The science behind rooting for the home team

Young children often observe society dividing its members—by ethnicity, religion, gender, or even favorite sports team. But a review by a Yale psychologist published August 14 in the journal Trends in Cognitive Sciences ...

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