Body language difficult for schizophrenic

May 18, 2006

Most people have little trouble reading another's body language but not so for the schizophrenic, a study says.

Those afflicted with schizophrenia, even with mild-to-moderate symptoms and taking medications, have limited capacity to understand the meaning of posture or body movement before reacting socially, the report says.

The patient's intelligence appears unrelated to inability to perceive body language.

"Many people with schizophrenia, including those who are very bright, remain awkward in social situations," Dr. Sergio Paradiso of the University of Iowa team that conducted the study, said.

The results from the study appeared in the April issue of Schizophrenia Research. Previous studies showed schizophrenia clouded the understanding of emotion from facial expressions.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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