Doctors warn of dangers of flip-flops

August 2, 2006

In the wake of last month's decree that wearing flip-flops could result in job loss, British doctors have said the shoe could also result in health issues.

The Daily Mail reported that several doctors have come forward to detail the health concerns that face individuals that wear flip-flops including twisted ankles, joint pain and shin splints.

"Wearing flat shoes stretches the calf muscles hugely if the wearer is used to wearing a heel," Dr. Mike O'Neill told the newspaper. "It strains the Achilles tendon and the back of the leg. Pain can start to develop after two weeks."

With 55,100 people seeking medical treatment in Britain in 2002 for injuries related to the summer apparel, doctors such as London foot surgeon Dr. Barry Francis have seen an average of six patients a week with similar complaints.

"The problems are down to overuse," the doctor told the paper.

"Every shoe fashion causes problems to an extent although this one seems to be taking a while to subside."

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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