FDA approves 2006 strain of flu vaccine

August 3, 2006

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the manufacture of this year's seasonal influenza vaccine.

The vaccine is designed to fight new virus strains scientists believe are likely to cause flu in the Northern Hemisphere during 2006-07.

Each year influenza vaccine manufacturers submit information and samples to the FDA of the virus strains to be produced for the upcoming seasonal influenza season. This season's FDA-approved formulation is identical to that recommended by the World Health Organization. The formulation includes one strain that was used in last year's vaccine and two new strains.

Seasonal flu vaccines do not protect against avian influenza, which is caused by different viral strains.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say up to 20 percent of the U.S. population is stricken by influenza annually, with about 200,000 people requiring hospitalization and approximately 36,000 people dying from the disease.

At high risk for serious flu complications are elderly people, children and people with certain chronic medical conditions.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: CDC: Influenza vaccine 48 percent effective overall

Related Stories

CDC: Influenza vaccine 48 percent effective overall

February 20, 2017

(HealthDay)—This year's influenza vaccine is a fairly good match for the circulating viruses, according to research published in the Feb. 17 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality ...

Flu shots are worth it

December 28, 2016

(HealthDay)—The flu can be a serious threat to your health, but you can protect yourself by getting a flu shot, health experts say.

New, more effective strategy for producing flu vaccines

December 5, 2016

A team of researchers led by Yoshihiro Kawaoka, professor of pathobiological sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine, has developed technology that could improve the production of vaccines ...

Recommended for you

Drug combination defeats dengue, Ebola in mice, study finds

February 27, 2017

A combination of two cancer drugs inhibited both dengue and Ebola virus infections in mice in a study led by Stanford University School of Medicine researchers, despite the fact that these two viruses are vastly different ...

Autism risk genes linked to evolving brain

February 27, 2017

Genetic variants linked to autism spectrum disorders (ASD) may have been positively selected during human evolution because they also contribute to enhanced cognition, a new Yale study suggests.

Molecule stops fatal pediatric brain tumor

February 27, 2017

Northwestern Medicine scientists have found a molecule that stops the growth of an aggressive pediatric brain tumor. The tumor is always fatal and primarily strikes children under 10 years old.

New studies illustrate how gamers get good

February 27, 2017

We all know that practice makes us better at things, but scientists are still trying to understand what kinds of practice work best. A research team led by a Brown University computer scientist has found insights about how ...

World-first genetic clues point to risk of blindness

February 27, 2017

Australian scientists have discovered the first evidence of genes that cause Macular Telangiectasia type 2 (MacTel), a degenerative eye disease which leads to blindness and is currently incurable and untreatable.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.