Bird flu virus strain found in Maryland

September 12, 2006

U.S. scientists say an H5N1 avian influenza virus found earlier this month in Maryland is a low pathogenic subtype and poses no threat to humans.

The scientists from the U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Interior said the virus was initially detected in fecal samples collected last month from resident wild mallard ducks in Maryland's Queen Anne's County. The same strain has been detected several times in wild birds in North America.

Genetic tests conducted at the USDA's National Veterinary Services Laboratories ruled out the possibility the samples carried the highly pathogenic strain of H5N1 avian influenza that is circulating in parts of Asia, Europe and Africa.

The government scientists say low pathogenic strains of avian influenza commonly occur in wild birds and typically cause only minor sickness or no noticeable signs of disease in the birds.

Low pathogenic H5N1 is very different from the more severe strains that spread rapidly and are often fatal to chickens and turkeys.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: The virus in the cupboard

Related Stories

The virus in the cupboard

February 9, 2017

Just as we're getting used to knowing we have trillions of bacteria populating us, from our eyeballs to our intestines, comes word that we need to look beyond bacteria to even smaller squatters: the virome, a vast community ...

An explanation of wild birds' role in avian flu outbreak

April 27, 2015

Wild birds are believed to be behind the first major widespread outbreak of bird flu in the United States. The H5N2 virus has cost Midwestern turkey and chicken producers almost 13 million birds since early March, including ...

Recommended for you

Success in the 3-D bioprinting of cartilage

April 28, 2017

A team of researchers at Sahlgrenska Academy has managed to generate cartilage tissue by printing stem cells using a 3-D-bioprinter. The fact that the stem cells survived being printed in this manner is a success in itself. ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.