IQ testing for obese people is challenged

January 23, 2007

A U.S. group is challenging an insurance company's requirement that morbidly obese people be given an IQ test before undergoing weight loss surgery.

The Tampa, Fla., Obesity Action Coalition says it believes Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Tennessee is the first insurer to require an IQ test to access any medical treatment.

"Requiring an IQ test to access any medical procedure is wrong and by implementing such a requirement, Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Tennessee is setting a dangerous precedent of denying healthcare based on intelligence testing," said OAC President Joseph Nadglowski Jr. in a statement. "In addition, the testing requirement perpetuates the false notion that those affected by obesity and morbid obesity are of lower intelligence on average then the general public."

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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