More Chinese wheat gluten is recalled

April 4, 2007

A U.S. pharmaceutical and nutritional chemicals company has recalled all possibly contaminated wheat gluten it has imported from a Chinese supplier.

The Las Vegas-based ChemNutra Co. -- a supplier to human and pet food manufacturers -- said the recalled wheat gluten had been imported in 25 kg. paper bags that were distributed to three pet food manufacturers and one company that supplies wheat gluten to the pet food industry.

ChemNutra said none of the 792 metric tons of the recalled products was shipped to facilities manufacturing food for human consumption.

U.S. Food and Drug Administration officials last Friday announced they had found the contaminant, melamine, used in making plastics, in samples of the wheat gluten ChemNutra had imported from one of its three Chinese suppliers.

Several pet food companies have initiated recalls of possibly melamine-contaminated pet foods involving numerous brands manufactured or distributed by Nestle Purina, Del Monte, and Menu Foods.

Melamine, which is also used in the manufacture of fertilizers, is not approved for use in U.S. foods. Several pet deaths are believed to have been caused by such contaminated pet food.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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