Russian speakers top suicide list

June 22, 2007

Demographers have determined that Russian language speakers are more likely to commit suicide than any other group in the world.

The State Statistics Service said Russia, with a suicide rate of 32 people in every 100,000, ranks behind only Lithuania and Belarus in the number of people who kill themselves each year, the Moscow Times reported Friday.

Since 1970, the number of people committing suicide in Russia has surpassed the number dying from accidental alcohol poisoning or murder.

The suicide rate has been dropping steadily, however, since the reaching record highs in the 1990s. The peak of 41 suicides per 100,000 people in 1995 was linked to turmoil surrounding the Soviet collapse, the newspaper said.

Psychologists say increased satisfaction with economic circumstances has played a key role in the growth in positive sentiment in Russia. Many people, however, continue to suffer from a lack of close-knit networks of families or friends and the near-absence of crisis centers offering free counseling.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Russia HIV infection bucks trends as World Aids Day marked

Related Stories

Russia HIV infection bucks trends as World Aids Day marked

December 1, 2015
On a frigid evening on the outskirts of Moscow, two HIV-prevention activists unzip backpacks, pull out packs of hypodermic needles and start discretely approaching people leaving a nearby pharmacy with an offer that could ...

One person commits suicide every 40 seconds, WHO reports

September 4, 2014
One person commits suicide every 40 seconds—more than all the yearly victims of wars and natural disaster—with the highest toll among the elderly, the United Nations said Thursday.

Russia? China? Who hacked Yahoo, and why?

September 23, 2016
Yahoo's claim that it is the victim of a gigantic state-sponsored hack raises the question of whether it is the latest target for hackers with the backing of Russia, China or even North Korea, experts say.

10-year jump in life expectancy for rich nations, US lags: OECD

November 4, 2015
Rich countries have gained more than 10 years in life expectancy on average since 1970, a study released by the OECD said Wednesday, but the United States has slumped to near the bottom.

Binge drinking is strongly associated with eating problems among Russian girls

February 20, 2015
Adolescent binge drinking has been linked to a host of problems, including worse school performance, risky sexual behaviors, illicit drugs, and a greater risk of suicide. Binge drinking may also be linked to problematic eating ...

Recommended for you

Researchers find common psychological traits in group of Italians aged 90 to 101

December 12, 2017
In remote Italian villages nestled between the Mediterranean Sea and mountains lives a group of several hundred citizens over the age of 90. Researchers at the University of Rome La Sapienza and University of California San ...

New therapy can help schizophrenia sufferers re-engage socially

December 11, 2017
A new therapy aimed at helping young people suffering from schizophrenia to reconnect and engage with the world around them has had promising results, according to a new University of Sussex-led study.

Certain books can increase infant learning during shared reading, study shows

December 11, 2017
Parents and pediatricians know that reading to infants is a good thing, but new research shows reading books that clearly name and label people and objects is even better.

Twitter can reveal our shared mood

December 11, 2017
In the largest study of its kind, researchers from the University of Bristol have analysed mood indicators in text from 800 million anonymous messages posted on Twitter. These tweets were found to reflect strong patterns ...

Infant brain responses predict reading speed in secondary school

December 11, 2017
A study conducted at the Department of Psychology at the University of Jyväskylä, Finland and Jyväskylä Centre for Interdisciplinary Brain Research (CIBR) has found that the brain responses of infants with an inherited ...

Many different types of anxiety and depression exist, new study finds

December 8, 2017
Five new categories of mental illness that cut across the current more broad diagnoses of anxiety and depression have been identified by researchers in a Stanford-led study.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.