Russian speakers top suicide list

June 22, 2007

Demographers have determined that Russian language speakers are more likely to commit suicide than any other group in the world.

The State Statistics Service said Russia, with a suicide rate of 32 people in every 100,000, ranks behind only Lithuania and Belarus in the number of people who kill themselves each year, the Moscow Times reported Friday.

Since 1970, the number of people committing suicide in Russia has surpassed the number dying from accidental alcohol poisoning or murder.

The suicide rate has been dropping steadily, however, since the reaching record highs in the 1990s. The peak of 41 suicides per 100,000 people in 1995 was linked to turmoil surrounding the Soviet collapse, the newspaper said.

Psychologists say increased satisfaction with economic circumstances has played a key role in the growth in positive sentiment in Russia. Many people, however, continue to suffer from a lack of close-knit networks of families or friends and the near-absence of crisis centers offering free counseling.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Russia HIV infection bucks trends as World Aids Day marked

Related Stories

Russia HIV infection bucks trends as World Aids Day marked

December 1, 2015

On a frigid evening on the outskirts of Moscow, two HIV-prevention activists unzip backpacks, pull out packs of hypodermic needles and start discretely approaching people leaving a nearby pharmacy with an offer that could ...

Russia? China? Who hacked Yahoo, and why?

September 23, 2016

Yahoo's claim that it is the victim of a gigantic state-sponsored hack raises the question of whether it is the latest target for hackers with the backing of Russia, China or even North Korea, experts say.

Recommended for you

Game study not playing around with PTSD relief

May 26, 2017

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) patients wrestling with one of its main symptoms may find long-term relief beyond medication thanks to the work of a Western researcher.

Bouldering envisioned as new treatment for depression

May 25, 2017

A growing body of research suggests that bouldering, a form of rock climbing, can help build muscle and endurance while reducing stress—and a new study co-led by a University of Arizona doctoral student of psychology suggests ...

Study documents range of challenging meditation experiences

May 24, 2017

Meditation is increasingly being marketed as a treatment for conditions such as pain, depression, stress and addiction, and while many people achieve therapeutic goals, other meditators encounter a much broader range of experiences—sometimes ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.