80 percent of NYC trans-fat free

July 1, 2007

The Health Department says more than 80 percent of New York City restaurants are now trans-fat free.

Facing a Sunday deadline, most restaurants have eliminated artificial trans fat in oils used for frying, a health department survey said Friday.

The report said 83 percent of restaurants were not using artificial trans fat for frying as of June 1.

The Sunday deadline applies to oils, shortening and margarine used for frying and spreading. Baked goods or prepared foods, or oils used to deep-fry dough or cake batter are covered under the second phase of the regulation, which takes effect July 1, 2008.

"The vast majority of restaurants are using trans-fat free oil for frying," Health Commissioner Dr. Thomas R. Frieden said in a news release. "This confirms that the switch is feasible. But many restaurants are still using spreads such as margarine that contain artificial trans fat. These products need to be replaced with widely available alternatives."

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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