Nutrition labels for alcohol proposed

August 1, 2007

A proposed federal regulation would make nutrition labels mandatory on all beer, wine and other alcohol sold in the United States.

The labels would list calories, fat, protein, carbohydrates and percent of alcohol by volume, McClatchy Newspapers said Wednesday.

The U.S. Treasury Department said that alcohol percentage information is too important to be left as voluntary information, McClatchy Newspapers said.

Officials said calorie labeling "could provide a constant, low-cost reminder that alcohol consumption adds generally empty, discretionary calories to the diet."

The calories in a bottle of beer can be as low as 95 or as high as 340, while a glass of wine can contain anywhere from 100 to 235 calories.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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