Cholera outbreak reported in Namibia

March 12, 2008

Health officials in Namibia say one person has died in a cholera outbreak in the Engela Health District, which has been compromised by floods.

Dr. Richard Kamwi, minister of health and social services, said 72 suspected cases of cholera were reported in the past week, New Era reported Tuesday. The Namibian newspaper reported Monday that the Engela State Hospital had been completely cut off by floodwater.

Cholera is an acute illness with profuse watery diarrhea that is transmitted mainly by drinking or eating contaminated water or food.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

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