Only 44 percent satisfied with sex life

March 4, 2008

A British condom maker says fewer than half of all the people it surveyed are satisfied with their sex lives.

The Durex Sexual Wellbeing Survey asked 26,000 people worldwide in-depth questions about aspects of their health, well-being, social circumstances, education, beliefs, sex lives and attitudes to sex, the company said Monday in a news release.

While 60 percent of those surveyed said sex is an enjoyable, vital part of life, only 44 percent said they were fully satisfied with that aspect of their lives. The survey found that frequency of sex and sexual satisfaction peaks between the ages of 20 and 34 but people over the age of 65 are still having sex more than once a week.

Eighty-two percent of people who are sexually satisfied said they feel respected by their partner during sex, 36 percent would like more quality time alone with their partner, 31 percent would like more fun and better communication and intimacy with their partner, and 29 percent would like a higher sex drive.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

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