Healthcare worker diagnosed with TB

April 18, 2008

The New Mexico Department of Health is screening 250 people for tuberculosis after a healthcare worker was diagnosed with the disease.

The testing is being conducted in Albuquerque and Clovis, N.M., on those who may have been exposed to TB through contact with the unidentified healthcare worker, the agency said Wednesday in a release.

Federal and state patient privacy laws prohibit the health department from releasing the name of the person or identifying information.

"We know who was potentially exposed to TB in this case, and we will be in touch with you if we think you need to be tested," Dr. Marcos Burgos said in a statement. "We are contacting individuals who may have been exposed so we can treat them if they are infected."

The health department has already tested 73 people for the disease. So far, no one has been infected, officials said.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

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