Santa Baby: The Secrets to Santa's Sexiness

December 18, 2009, University of St Andrews

(PhysOrg.com) -- As Mr and Mrs Claus continue to enjoy the world's longest surviving marriage, a team of researchers at the University of St Andrews set out to uncover the secrets of Santa's enduring attractiveness.

Although he may not fit the mould of a traditional Hollywood hunk, the team of have identified the solid scientific foundations that underlie this abiding sexiness.

Their analysis found that his tubby tummy, rosy glow, status as the head of a world-wide holiday economy, and kindness to children all play a part in Santa's desirability as a mate.

These findings are consistent with previous research, which has suggested that women are attracted to partners well-suited to their climate and environment, while red skin is indicative of health, an affinity for children indicates paternal skills, and material resources are attractive to the maternal instinct.

The study was carried out by Ross Whitehead, Daniel Re and Amanda Hahn of the University's Laboratory.

Ross Whitehead commented, "Mrs Claus knows that from his love for and huge bank account to his belly that shakes like a bowl full of jelly, Saint Nick is a real catch.

"Other ladies may fantasise about tickling him underneath his beard so snowy white, but is a one-woman man, an all-around family guy, and one who can afford to treat his wife properly, and that is why Mrs Claus has faithfully remained by his side for centuries."

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