Study Finds Treatment With Anabolic Hormone May Enhance Local Bone Regeneration

December 22, 2009, Yale University

(PhysOrg.com) -- In research that could open new avenues of investigation in the prevention and treatment of fractures, in bone regeneration and tissue engineering, scientists from Yale School of Medicine have found that a combination of bone marrow aspiration followed by treatment with anabolic parathyroid hormone (PTH) greatly boosted bone regeneration in localized areas in rats. The study appears online in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.

The Yale team removed marrow from the femurs of and treated the animals with PTH for three months. Earlier studies had shown that such treatment for three weeks produced robust but short-lived at the site of marrow removal. Over a three-month period, however, the researchers saw a 30 percent increase in .

According to lead author Agnčs Vignery, D.D.S, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation and Molecular and Cellular Biology at Yale, “This approach is simple and fast, and can lead to the formation of an amount of bone sufficient to prevent fractures in specific skeletal sites.”

The team further determined that filling the bone cavity with a bio-compatible calcium phosphate cement in rats treated with PTH over the same three month period also resulted in increased cortical thickness of the bone.

This aspect of the Yale research could have implications in the field of as calcium phosphate cements may provide a strong scaffold for new bone growth. “The marrow cavity offers a special niche to make new bone, which had not been explored to date,” Vignery said. “The use of bio-compatible calcium phosphate cement is an exciting and promising route to target the formation of new bone in lieu of bone marrow in skeletal sites that are at risk for fracture.”

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Lab-on-a-chip delivers critical immunity data for vulnerable populations

April 25, 2018
For millions of displaced people around the world—many of them refugees, living in temporary shelters under crowded conditions—an outbreak of disease is devastating. Each year, the measles virus kills more than 134,000 ...

Want new medicines? You need fundamental research

April 25, 2018
Would we be wise to prioritize "shovel-ready" science over curiosity-driven, fundamental research programs? Would that set the stage for the discovery of more new medicines over the long term?

Implantable islet cells come with their own oxygen supply

April 25, 2018
Since the 1960s, researchers have been interested in the possibility of treating type 1 diabetes by transplanting islet cells—the pancreatic cells that are responsible for producing insulin when blood glucose concentration ...

'Incompatible' donor stem cells cure adult sickle cell patients

April 25, 2018
Doctors at the University of Illinois Hospital have cured seven adult patients of sickle cell disease, an inherited blood disorder primarily affecting the black community, using stem cells from donors previously thought to ...

Mammary stem cells challenge costly bovine disease

April 24, 2018
Mastitis is the most expensive disease in the dairy industry. Each clinical case can cost a dairy farmer more than $400 and damages both the cow's future output as well as her comfort.

Research explains link between exercise and appetite loss

April 24, 2018
Ever wonder why intense exercise temporarily curbs your appetite? In research described in today's issue of PLOS Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine researchers reveal that the answer is all in your head—more specifically, ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.