Researchers Study Link Between Pollutants, Health Issues in Detroit Neighborhoods

January 21, 2010
Researchers Study Link Between Pollutants, Health Issues in Detroit Neighborhoods
Clarkson University is using its Mobile Air Pollution Laboratory to measure the distribution of air pollution near Detroit’s highways.

(PhysOrg.com) -- Clarkson University researchers are helping the University of Michigan’s School of Public Health to study the link between air pollutants and health problems in children in Detroit.

"The overall project is designed to examine the relationship between asthma in children and exposures within 150 yards of major highways," said Philip K. Hopke, director of Clarkson’s Center for the Environment and professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering.

To conduct the study, Clarkson is using its Mobile Laboratory (MAPL) to measure the distribution of air pollution near Detroit’s highways. The MAPL can monitor a number of pollutants, including , ultrafine particles, , carbon monoxide and .

Suresh Raja, research assistant professor, said measurements were taken close to several highways, with additional measurements taken at several intervals moving away from the highways. "We did this in about eight areas and each area had about 12 stops," he said.

The first set of data was collected in October 2009 with a second set scheduled for April 2010, Raja said. Between the two collections, "we can estimate what kind of exposures would be there year-round."

"What we see is most of the black carbon in very high concentrations in areas closer to the highway as you would expect," he said, but, "it doesn’t mean you wouldn’t get those kind of exposures if you live far away from the highway, because we have meteorology playing a role in picking up these pollutants and transporting it to other places."

The two-year study also includes monitoring the indoor and outdoor environments of 210 asthmatic Detroit children living near highways. Researchers expect to find that pollution from cars and trucks will be a larger factor in the children’s asthma than any other source of pollution. Allergies and the presence of cigarette smokers in the household are expected to make the effects of pollution from the highways even worse.

Hopke said Clarkson has conducted similar tests in other cities. In Syracuse, he said, officials are discussing moving Interstate 81 instead replacing it as it nears the end of its useful life. "Our results will help inform the decision by better quantifying the impact of the on local air quality." The MAPL has also been used to measure the distribution of pollutants near I-490 and I-590 in Rochester.

The research, Hopke said, will help strengthen Clarkson’s role as a leader in aerosol and atmospheric science and exposure assessment. "The results of these studies will provide valuable insights into the heterogeneity of exposure in urban areas where there are major highways," he said.

Related Stories

Recommended for you

The social costs of smell loss in older women

March 22, 2017

A new study of older U.S. adults conducted by researchers from the Monell Center and collaborating institutions reports that a woman's social life is associated with how well her sense of smell functions. The study found ...

'Geofencing' shows promise in tracking chronic care

March 21, 2017

Location-tracking apps on smartphones could be used to help track and manage care for thousands of patients who suffer from chronic diseases, and possibly even provide feedback to them on lifestyle changes that could help, ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.