Distinct demographic profiles between Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis

February 5, 2010

Although inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) [comprising mainly Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC)] is thought to affect about 150 000 people in the United Kingdom, the prevalence of severe IBD is not known. Mortality following hospitalization for IBD is significant but little has been reported on long-term follow-up.

A research article to be published on January 28, 2010 in the addresses this question. The research team from United Kingdom determined the hospitalized prevalence of severe IBD and subsequent 5-year mortality in Wales, and investigated associations between severe IBD and social deprivation, distance travelled to hospital, and other socio-demographic characteristics.

They found that hospitalization for severe CD was more common among women than men and it peaked among younger people aged 16󈞉 years. UC was similar among men and women and was more common among older people. There was no link between social deprivation and UC, but CD was more common among more deprived social groups.

The differing demographic profiles between CD and UC, suggest that environmental factors play a more significant role in the etiology of CD. The findings of this large population-based study on the prevalence and of IBD are also important for service planning and provision.

More information: Button LA, Roberts SE, Goldacre MJ, Akbari A, Rodgers SE, Williams JG. Hospitalized prevalence and 5-year mortality for IBD: Record linkage study. World J Gastroenterol 2010; 16(4): 431-438, www.wjgnet.com/1007-9327/16/431.asp

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berniew1
not rated yet Feb 05, 2010
For both of these conditions, mercury is sometimes a factor in the conditions and they are improved by mercury body burden reductions and detoxification. Dental amalgam is the largest source of mercury in most who have several amalgam fillings (www.flcv.com/damspr1.html) so replacement of amalgams is often of benefit (www.flcv.com/hgremove.html) but chlorella supplementation is also documented to reduce mercury and toxic metal levels and to improve colitis in many. R.E. Merchant and C.A. Andre, Townsend Letter for Doctors & Patients, Feb/Mar 2001
Roj
not rated yet Feb 05, 2010
The Links are broke at http://www.flcv.com

wayback.com saved one page related to mercury.
http://web.archiv...r2f.html

It describes mercury in sewage, or passed thru the intestinal tract, without mention of Crohns or IBS syndrome, nor mention of evidence for bio-active toxicity of amalgam dental fillings in humans.

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