Innovative digital technologies assist specialists in anatomical reconstruction

April 28, 2010, Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Techniques for using digital technology in separating conjoined twins, developing facial prostheses and acquiring data from anthropologic specimens will be among the topics presented at a symposium sponsored by the American Association of Anatomists (AAA) on April 28. The symposium is part of the Experimental Biology 2010 conference being held April 24-28, 2010 at the Anaheim Convention Center.

"The common thread of digital technology in fields from to surgery to is its ability to enhance outcomes," said Suzanne N. Verma, MAMS, Assistant Professor and Anaplastologist, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at the Texas
A & M Health Science Center Baylor College of Dentistry in Dallas, who will co-chair the symposium. "Technology is the palette and the specialist's creativity is the brush."

Kenneth E. Salyer, MD, FACS, FAAP, of the World Craniofacial Foundation in Dallas will discuss how he used technology in planning the surgery performed to separate Egyptian conjoined twins Mohamed and Ahmed Ibrahim in 2003. The twins were joined at the top of their heads. Lessons learned from the successful separation and reconstruction of the twins are opening up new opportunities for future work in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

Douglas Owsley, PhD, Curator and Head of the Division of Physical Anthropology at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C., will discuss scientists' perspective of Kennewick Man, one of the earliest skeletons ever found in the Americas. Kennewick Man is more than 9,000 years old, and Dr. Owsley used digital technology to scan the specimen's skull and help to physically determine what it would look like with facial muscles and skin.

Ms. Verma will speak about how assists her in planning surgery and designing facial prostheses. "For example, we can use radiographic data to virtually create a 3D model of our patients, allowing us to preoperatively plan where to place an implant, plan the surgical approach for removing a tumor, or use the data to create a physical model of the missing anatomy" she said.

Andy Christensen, President of Medical Modeling Inc. in Golden, Colo. and co-chair of the symposium will discuss tactile medical modeling and the digital reconstruction process. In tactile medical modeling, specialists use data from digital imaging processes such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging to create accurate plastic models.

Other topics to be presented at the symposium include the assessment of hard tissue structure and mechanics using digital models, and synchronizing sound, spatial positioning and anatomic visualizations in real time.

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Best of Last Year—The top Medical Xpress articles of 2017

December 20, 2017
It was a good year for medical research as a team at the German center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Magdeburg, found that dancing can reverse the signs of aging in the brain. Any exercise helps, the team found, but dancing ...

Pickled in 'cognac', Chopin's heart gives up its secrets

November 26, 2017
The heart of Frederic Chopin, among the world's most cherished musical virtuosos, may finally have given up the cause of his untimely death.

Sugar industry withheld evidence of sucrose's health effects nearly 50 years ago

November 21, 2017
A U.S. sugar industry trade group appears to have pulled the plug on a study that was producing animal evidence linking sucrose to disease nearly 50 years ago, researchers argue in a paper publishing on November 21 in the ...

Female researchers pay more attention to sex and gender in medicine

November 7, 2017
When women participate in a medical research paper, that research is more likely to take into account the differences between the way men and women react to diseases and treatments, according to a new study by Stanford researchers.

Drug therapy from lethal bacteria could reduce kidney transplant rejection

August 3, 2017
An experimental treatment derived from a potentially deadly microorganism may provide lifesaving help for kidney transplant patients, according to an international study led by investigators at Cedars-Sinai.

Exploring the potential of human echolocation

June 25, 2017
People who are visually impaired will often use a cane to feel out their surroundings. With training and practice, people can learn to use the pitch, loudness and timbre of echoes from the cane or other sounds to navigate ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.