Molecular mechanism underlying natural taurine protection against hepatic fibrosis

April 20, 2010, World Journal of Gastroenterology

A research team from China investigated the global protein expression changes in hepatic stellate cells affected by taurine using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry platform. Their results showed that natural taurine can promote HSC apoptosis so as to inhibit hepatic fibrosis.

Hepatic (HF) occurs in most types of chronic liver diseases and approximately 25%-40% of HF cases may ultimately progress to hepatic cirrhosis. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) contribute significantly to the occurrence of HF and the activation of HSC is the key issue in the pathogenesis of HF. Taurine is a kind of important anti-injury substance in the body. Taurine has a protective effect on various types of . It has been clear that the antifibrotic mechanism of taurine may involve its inhibition of the activation and proliferation of HSCs. However, the of taurine-mediated antifibrotic activity is largely unknown.

A research article to be published on April 21, 2010 in the addresses this question. A research team led by Professor Jian Liang analyzed the differential expression of proteins between taurine-treated HSCs and controls by comparative proteomics technologies.

Nineteen differentially expressed proteins (11 up-regulated and 8 down-regulated) were identified by two-dimensional electrophoresis/mass spectrometry, and the expression profiles of GLO1 and ANXA1 were validated by Western blotting. GO analysis found that these differentially expressed proteins were enriched within biological processes such as "cellular ", "oxidation reaction" and "metabolic process" in clusters. Flow cytometric analysis showed that taurine-treated HSCs had a significantly increased apoptosis rate when compared with the control group.

Their results are very helpful to understand better the molecular mechanism underlying taurine's protection against HF and thereby provide new targets for the management of HF and drug development.

More information: Deng X, Liang J, Lin ZX, Wu FS, Zhang YP, Zhang ZW. Natural taurine promotes apoptosis of human hepatic stellate cells in proteomics analysis. World J Gastroenterol 2010;16(15): 1916-1923 www.wjgnet.com/1007-9327/full/v16/i15/1916.htm

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Putting black skin cancer to sleep—for good

February 22, 2018
An international research team has succeeded in stopping the growth of malignant melanoma by reactivating a protective mechanism that prevents tumor cells from dividing. The team used chemical agents to block the enzymes ...

New therapeutic gel shows promise against cancerous tumors

February 21, 2018
Scientists at the UNC School of Medicine and NC State have created an injectable gel-like scaffold that can hold combination chemo-immunotherapeutic drugs and deliver them locally to tumors in a sequential manner. The results ...

Kinase inhibitor larotrectinib shows durable anti-tumor abilities

February 21, 2018
Three simultaneous safety and efficacy studies of the drug larotrectinib reported an overall response rate of 75 percent for patients ages four months to 76 years with 17 different cancer diagnoses. All patients had tumors ...

Five novel genetic changes linked to pancreatic cancer risk

February 21, 2018
In what is believed to be the largest pancreatic cancer genome-wide association study to date, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and the National Cancer Institute, and collaborators from over 80 other ...

Similarities found in cancer initiation in kidney, liver, stomach, pancreas

February 21, 2018
Recent research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis demonstrated that mature cells in the stomach sometimes revert back to behaving like rapidly dividing stem cells. Now, the researchers have found that ...

Research could change how doctors treat leukemia and other cancers fed by fat

February 21, 2018
Obesity and cancer risk have a mysterious relationship, with obesity increasing the risk for 13 types of cancer. For some cancers—including pediatric cancers—obesity affects survival rates, which are lower for people ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.