Superstition proved to improve performance

June 14, 2010 by Lin Edwards, Medical Xpress report

(PhysOrg.com) -- Superstitions are often regarded as irrational and inconsequential, but researchers in Germany have been taking them seriously, trying to identify the benefits of superstitions, if any, and their underlying psychological mechanisms.

Social psychologist Lysann Damisch, who is interested in sports, noticed that many players have lucky charms or engage in superstitious behavior before their events. She realized the players thought they were gaining some benefit from the superstition, but as a scientist, Damisch wondered what benefits were gained and how the superstitions worked.

Damisch teamed with colleagues Barbara Stoberock and Thomas Mussweiler, also from the University of Cologne, to design four experiments to test the effectiveness of good-luck superstitions based on a common saying (such as saying “break a leg” to an actor before a ), an action (such as crossing the fingers), or a lucky charm. The superstitions were tested to see whether or not they improved subsequent performance in motor dexterity, memory, solving anagrams, or playing golf.

In the first experiment subjects were given either a “lucky golf ball” or an ordinary golf ball, and were then given a golf task to perform. In the second experiment subjects were given a motor dexterity task to perform, in which they had to tilt a cube to get 36 ball bearings into a grid of 36 holes. Half the subjects were told to simply start the game, while for the other half the researcher told them “I press the thumbs for you,” which is the German equivalent of crossing fingers.

In the third and fourth experiments the subjects brought their own lucky charms, which the researchers took away to be photographed. Only half the subjects had their lucky charms returned, while the rest were told there were problems with the camera and the charm would have to remain in the other room. The subjects were then given a questionnaire to gauge their degree of confidence and optimism for the task ahead. They were then asked to complete a memory task in which they had to match pairs of face-down cards in an array of 18.

In the fourth experiment the subjects again brought their own lucky charms and only half were allowed to keep them. They also completed a questionnaire, but this time were given an anagram task to complete, in which they had to make as many words as possible from a group of eight letters. They also had to set a goal for themselves.

The results of all four experiments showed the superstition did improve performance. In the golf task those with the “lucky ball” performed significantly better than the control, and those doing the motor dexterity test were faster and better if the researcher wished them luck.

The third and fourth experiments showed the improvements were brought about by changes in “perceived self-efficacy,” with those keeping their lucky charms reporting they felt confident and competent to carry out the task. The fourth experiment also indicated performance was improved because the superstitious belief led them to try harder and be more persistent, because those who kept their lucky charms set higher goals for themselves and kept working longer on the puzzle.

The research is the first time superstitions associated with good luck have been demonstrated to affect future performance beneficially. It also showed the superstition worked even if it was activated by someone else (as in the first and second experiments).

The research also gives some insight into how superstition works. In each case the superstition was essentially found to boost a participant’s confidence in their own abilities, and this resulted in enhanced performance. The increased confidence also encouraged them to work harder at the task and to persist until they succeeded.

Damisch and her colleagues plan to test negative, or bad-luck, superstitions next and see if they also affect performance.

The paper, entitled “Keep your Fingers Crossed! How Superstition Improves Performance” was published in the journal Psychological Science.

More information: Lysann Damisch et al.: Keep Your Fingers Crossed! How Superstition Improves Performance, Psychological Science, Published online before print May 28, 2010, doi:10.1177/0956797610372631

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Researchers explore how information enters our brains

July 17, 2018
Think you're totally in control of your thoughts? Maybe not as much as you think, according to a new San Francisco State University study that examines how thoughts that lead to actions enter our consciousness.

Early puberty in white adolescent boys increases substance use risk

July 16, 2018
White adolescent boys experiencing early puberty are at higher risk for substance use than later developing boys, a new Purdue University study finds.

WHO recognises 'compulsive sexual behaviour' as mental disorder

July 15, 2018
The World Health Organization has recognised "compulsive sexual behaviour" as a mental disorder, but said Saturday it remained unclear if it was an addiction on a par with gambling or drug abuse.

How looking at the big picture can lead to better decisions

July 13, 2018
New research suggests how distancing yourself from a decision may help you make the choice that produces the most benefit for you and others affected.

Nature is proving to be awesome medicine for PTSD

July 13, 2018
The awe we feel in nature can dramatically reduce symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, according to UC Berkeley research that tracked psychological and physiological changes in war veterans and at-risk inner-city youth ...

Is depression during pregnancy on the rise?

July 13, 2018
(HealthDay)—Today's young mothers-to-be may be more likely to develop depression while pregnant than their own mothers were, a new study suggests.

8 comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

gmurphy
5 / 5 (1) Jun 14, 2010
self perception is everything. If only we didn't have to resort to 'lucky charms' to unlock our full potential, maybe some form of self hypnosis?
nohuman
5 / 5 (3) Jun 14, 2010
I wonder if it was the lucky ones that did better or if it was the unlucky ones that did worse than normal.
These were obviously superstitious. How would a non-superstitious group perform?
Scalziand
4.5 / 5 (2) Jun 14, 2010
self perception is everything. If only we didn't have to resort to 'lucky charms' to unlock our full potential, maybe some form of self hypnosis?


Superstitions are a form of self hypnosis.
Modernmystic
5 / 5 (1) Jun 14, 2010
It may be that it allows people who otherwise would be focused on what they didn't want to focus on what they do want.

If people are focused on what they do want, it's hardly surprising they get it more often than people who aren't.
trekgeek1
5 / 5 (5) Jun 14, 2010
Mental placebo's. Got it. Similar article titles are:
"If you believe you can..........."
"Positive thinking improves........."
"Believe in yourself..........."

I am not surprised with the results. I had no doubt that peoples irrational beliefs were capable of helping them by reinforcing their confidence.
Simonsez
4 / 5 (1) Jun 14, 2010
So the research suggests that (irrational) belief in a positive outcome associated with, in this case, physical objects can lead to actual positive outcome. In the end, they are suggesting as trekgeek1, that humans have the potential to improve performance simply by focusing on improving performance. That seems simple enough. Does it also suggest that the test subjects evidenced self-limitation? As in, "I can do this good, but no better - unless I have an increase in 'luck'" via physical object or action by self or another (crossing of fingers, etc).
HealingMindN
not rated yet Jun 14, 2010
Does this mean that superstitions are consistently associated with lucky charms? Is that how those hucksters selling "haunted jewelry" on eBay are always making a killing?
xstos
4.3 / 5 (4) Jun 14, 2010
maybe this explains why religion is so pervasive.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.