Single incision in multi-vessel cardiac bypass reduces pain, recovery time

September 15, 2010, The Methodist Hospital System

Surgeons at the Methodist DeBakey Heart & Vascular Center perform multiple cardiac vessel bypasses through a single, small incision in the patient's side, reducing pain, recovery time and risk for infection.

"This represents a big improvement on older versions of minimally invasive bypass procedures," said Dr. Mahesh Ramchandani, cardiac surgeon at Methodist."By approaching the heart from the patient's side, rather than going in directly over the heart, we can reduce trauma to the patient's ribs and we can see the heart better, which allows us to safely perform multi-vessel bypasses in one minimally invasive procedure," Ramchandani said.

Ramchandani has performed approximately 150 multi-vessel cardiac bypasses using this new approach, a technique he teaches to surgeons in a monthly hands-on, interactive class held in the Methodist Institute for Technology, Innovation and Education (MITIE). He has trained more than 50 surgeons who have come to Methodist from across the world for his expertise.

Ramchandani and his team, including specialists in surgery, cardiology, stenting and advanced imaging, provide a unique multidisciplinary approach to patients with ischemic heart disease. Using Methodist's new hybrid robotic operating room, the team will soon be able to perform bypass grafting plus stenting as a single procedure, using only a few small incisions. This provides the patient with much more tailored, personalized and safer care than has previously existed for minimally-invasive treatment of blockages in the cardiac arteries.

"Patients with cancer tend to have a team approach to their care. They see an oncologist, a surgeon and a radiation therapist who coordinate their care. That's uncommon for patients with disease, but that's what we're providing at Methodist," Ramchandani said. "With this model, we offer more comprehensive care, more tailored, personalized care, and better outcomes for our patients. MICS CABG is a cornerstone of these advanced approaches that combine the best available treatments for our patients."

Ramchandani and his team have also helped advance the use of special "enabling" technologies to refine the procedure so it can be taught easily and made available for more patients across the country.

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Best of Last Year—The top Medical Xpress articles of 2017

December 20, 2017
It was a good year for medical research as a team at the German center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Magdeburg, found that dancing can reverse the signs of aging in the brain. Any exercise helps, the team found, but dancing ...

Pickled in 'cognac', Chopin's heart gives up its secrets

November 26, 2017
The heart of Frederic Chopin, among the world's most cherished musical virtuosos, may finally have given up the cause of his untimely death.

Sugar industry withheld evidence of sucrose's health effects nearly 50 years ago

November 21, 2017
A U.S. sugar industry trade group appears to have pulled the plug on a study that was producing animal evidence linking sucrose to disease nearly 50 years ago, researchers argue in a paper publishing on November 21 in the ...

Female researchers pay more attention to sex and gender in medicine

November 7, 2017
When women participate in a medical research paper, that research is more likely to take into account the differences between the way men and women react to diseases and treatments, according to a new study by Stanford researchers.

Drug therapy from lethal bacteria could reduce kidney transplant rejection

August 3, 2017
An experimental treatment derived from a potentially deadly microorganism may provide lifesaving help for kidney transplant patients, according to an international study led by investigators at Cedars-Sinai.

Exploring the potential of human echolocation

June 25, 2017
People who are visually impaired will often use a cane to feel out their surroundings. With training and practice, people can learn to use the pitch, loudness and timbre of echoes from the cane or other sounds to navigate ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.