Medical researchers break down costs to care for heart failure patients at the end of life

October 12, 2010

As the population ages, health care epidemiologist Padma Kaul and cardiologist Paul Armstrong, researchers in the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry at the University of Alberta, want health-care professionals to talk to their patients about their options on places to die, whether it be at home, in hospital or a palliative care facility like hospice.

The researchers found, in their recent study, that the majority of heart failure patients pass away in an acute care hospital and the cost is more than double for those who died elsewhere.

This is the first study to examine costs, including inpatient, outpatient, physician, and drug costs, at the end of life among heart failure patients in Canada. Researchers examined data on over 30,000 elderly patients with heart failure who died between 2000 and 2006 in Alberta.

"End of life is a big issue, not only in Canada but in the western world," said Kaul, an Alberta Innovates-Health Solutions Investigator. "If you ask anyone they want to die with dignity surrounded by their loved ones, I don't think anyone wants to die in the hospital with tubes coming out of their various body parts. Nobody has really looked at this issue specifically in the heart failure population."

More than 500,000 Canadians live with heart failure and another 50,000 acquire it each year. The aging Canadian population assures that heart failure rates will increase substantially in coming years and pose a major challenge to the publicly funded Canadian health-care system.

"It is critical for the Canadian health-care system and for all of us to engage in a discussion about where people spend their last days," said Armstrong, senior author on the paper which was published in the online October 11 edition of Archives of Internal Medicine. "We need to ask how they'd like to be treated and how this should be best handled in a health-care system that's straining and re-examining how to best use limited resources."

Kaul is a co-author on a similar study conducted among elderly patients in the United States, which will also appear in the same issue of the scientific journal. The study shows a dramatic increase in the use of hospice facilities among patients between 2000 and 2007.

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Newly discovered viral marker could help predict flu severity in infected patients

October 20, 2017
Flu viruses contain defective genetic material that may activate the immune system in infected patients, and new research published in PLOS Pathogens suggests that lower levels of these molecules could increase flu severity.

Flu simulations suggest pandemics more likely in spring, early summer

October 19, 2017
New statistical simulations suggest that Northern Hemisphere flu pandemics are most likely to emerge in late spring or early summer at the tail end of the normal flu season, according to a new study published in PLOS Computational ...

Migraines may be the brain's way of dealing with oxidative stress

October 19, 2017
A new perspective article highlights a compelling theory about migraine attacks: that they are an integrated mechanism by which the brain protects and repairs itself. Recent insightful findings and potential ways to use them ...

H7N9 influenza is both lethal and transmissible in animal model for flu

October 19, 2017
In 2013, an influenza virus that had never before been detected began circulating among poultry in China. It caused several waves of human infection and in late 2016, the number of people to become sick from the H7N9 virus ...

New insights into herpes virus could inform vaccine development

October 18, 2017
A team of scientists has discovered new insights into the mechanisms of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, as well as two antibodies that block the virus' entry into cells. The findings, published in Proceedings of the National ...

Pair of discoveries illuminate new paths to flu and anthrax treatments

October 17, 2017
Two recent studies led by biologists at the University of California San Diego have set the research groundwork for new avenues to treat influenza and anthrax poisoning.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.