First Dominican cholera death suspected as cases soar

December 26, 2010

As cholera infections soar in the Dominican Republic, health authorities probed Sunday a possible first fatality from an outbreak that has killed thousands in Haiti.

Twenty-three new infections brought the total to 105 in Haiti's more developed neighbor, Health Minister Bautista Rojas said, adding that the suspect death was an unnamed individual in the south of the country.

"We had unprecedented growth (of the disease) in the southern provinces of San Juan and Azua," Rojas told reporters. Among the victims, 11 have been admitted to health clinics and the rest have been discharged.

Haiti, where the Caribbean nation's first in over a century has killed over 2,500 people since it surfaced in mid-October, and the Dominican Republic share a porous 376-kilometer (234-mile) border.

Health officials in the Dominican Republic have introduced new measures to try to slow the advance of the disease from Haiti.

The Santo Domingo government forbids the use of water from the Artibonite River that traverses most of the island of Hispaniola and is thought to have been the source of the epidemic.

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Quantum_Conundrum
1 / 5 (2) Dec 26, 2010
I guess the U.S. and U.N. are going to end up just having to go build everyone else's infrastructure for them, since they seem incapable of learning anything or doing so for themselves.

how a fecal to oral transmitted disease could become an "epidemic" in the modern world is beyond belief, even following an earthquake. No sewer or septic system, and no water treatment, and someone shits in the river up stream, viola, everybody dies.

This is just like the guinea worm thing in africa. People still drink untreated, shitty water from a ditch, river, or mud hole and then wonder why they get parasites and killer diseases.

What the heck has been the point of decades and decades of governments and churches setting up schools and hospitals for these people, and giving them free food, clothing, and even making houses for them in some cases, and they are still living as ignorant of a lifestyle as ever before?
Caliban
5 / 5 (2) Dec 26, 2010
I guess the U.S. and U.N. are going to end up just having to go build everyone else's infrastructure for them, since they seem incapable of learning anything or doing so for themselves.

how a fecal to oral transmitted disease could become an "epidemic" in the modern world is beyond belief, [...]hospitals for these people, and giving them free food, clothing, and even making houses for them in some cases, and they are still living as ignorant of a lifestyle as ever before?


Your ignorance is astonishing. Go visit any of the 3rd world nations you mention. When you return, we'll see if your complete lack of understanding of the actual conditions under which the general populations live, and why they do so, is so glibly trotted out in subsequent comments.

In the meantime, consider just how short a fucking step it is from an outbreak of E. coli, Salmonella or Giardia, to an outbreak of Cholera.

Quantum_Conundrum
1 / 5 (1) Dec 26, 2010
Caliban:

Do you realize there hasn't been anything remotely like this in the U.S. in decades thanks to modern vaccines and sanitation? Certainly not in my entire life. The closest thing was last year's "Swine Flu".

I got a half decent idea guy. In many of the African nations they often live in areas dominated by tribal or civil wars, and with a general technology level roughly the equivalent of pre-civil war era U.S., or worse in many cases. It makes you wonder why nobody ever seems to advance any, or don't just get up and leave.

As for Haiti, all my life the average family there has lived in a house that isn't even as well built as a shed we might build over the weekend, and there has been little or no progress worth mentioning. What little roads and technology you see on a news program is only the wealthiest sections of the wealthiest cities.

An actual "outbreak" of Cholera in America today is almost physically impossible, thanks to water treatment plants and modads.
Quantum_Conundrum
1 / 5 (1) Dec 26, 2010
We were using what was called "4th generation computers" 15 years ago. I don't know what generation we call them now, because I guess they quit counting.

In the mean time, these people haven't managed to discover electricity or clean water, even with us trying to give it to them for free.

And no, there is no magic pill solution for them, because they are so ignorant and undeveloped that they don't even have a use for our technology, and they have nothing to offer anyone who does have half-decent modern technology or infrastructure.
yyz
5 / 5 (2) Dec 26, 2010
"And no, there is no magic pill solution for them, because they are so ignorant and undeveloped that they don't even have a use for our technology, and they have nothing to offer anyone who does have half-decent modern technology or infrastructure."

Wow QC, how Christian of you. I'd think you would be offering prayers for their plight instead of calling them ignorant and worthless. Especially since the earthquake was an "Act of God" (or a pact with the devil, take your pick: http://articles.c..._s=PM:US ).

So much for Christian charity. Merry Christmas.
Husky
not rated yet Dec 27, 2010
well i would say that ignorant nepalese peacekeepers aided haiti in getting the cholera, they shitted in the river, it was the asian strain and asians can often carry it while not being sick

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