New model for studying germ cell tumors in testes enlists embryonic stem cells

July 11, 2011

A team of researchers from Spain and Switzerland have developed a new model for studying the development of testicular germ cell tumors by transplanting embryonic stem cells into the seminiferous tubules in mouse models, resulting in the development of testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT) that mimic the early stages of TGCT development. The study, published in Cell Transplantation (20:5), is now freely available on-line.

"Over the last fifteen years, cell transplantation into seminiferous tubules has become a valuable tool for studying germinal cell biology," said the study's corresponding author Dr. Juan Arechaga of the University of Basque Country, Spain. "The blood-testes permeability barrier establishes a sealed compartment that protects against influences such as immunological rejection. Thus, our lab has developed a tumor assay to study the process in testicular germ cell tumors using injected into the seminiferous tubules."

According to Dr. Arechaga, the tumors generated by the transplantation of early embryos possess gene expressions and differentiation patterns similar to those in testicular germ cell tumors.

The researchers point out that testicular germ cell tumors are uncommon in non-human animals, so there have been no previously suitable animal models for study. However these tumors appear to be genetically regulated and the specific genes related to the development of this kind of tumor have been identified.

"Embryonic into mouse seminiferous tubules represents a model with very valuable potential applications because it mimics the pre-invasive state of TGCTs," said Dr. Arechaga. " can be transfected with different transgenes before transplantation to evaluate certain genes during the invasive process."

The authors also note that the approach could also be useful in screening novel , including inhibitors of angiogenesis and metastasis, to potentially treat TGCTs.

"This study demonstrates the development of an animal model of testicular germ cell tumor formation" said Dr. David Eve, associate editor of Cell Transplantation and Instructor at the Center of Excellence for Aging and Brain Repair, University of South Florida. "Study of this model will further our understanding of how testicular cancers arise and potential ways to treat it."

More information: Silván, U.; Díez-Torre, A.; Andrade, R.; Arluzea, J.; Silió, M.; Aréchaga, J. Embryonic Stem Cell Transplantation Into Seminiferous Tubules: A Model for the Study of Invasive Germ Cell Tumors of the Testis. Cell Transplant. 20(5):637-642; 2011. www.ingentaconnect.com/content/cog/ct/

Provided by: Cell Transplantation Center of Excellence for Aging and Brain Repair

shares

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Ancient stress response provides clues to cancer resistance

April 25, 2017

Cancer is often able to craftily outwit the best techniques modern medicine has developed to treat it. In an attempt to understand and combat cancer's vaunted prowess, an unusual collaboration between physicists and a leading ...

Studying a catalyst for blood cancers

April 25, 2017

Imagine this scenario on a highway: A driver starts to make a sudden lane change but realizes his mistake and quickly veers back, too late. Other motorists have already reacted and, in some cases, collide. Meanwhile, the ...

Savior of T-cells may be enemy of liver immune cells

April 24, 2017

Researchers at Houston Methodist demonstrated that a surface protein called OX40, responsible for keeping one type of immune system cell alive, can trigger the death of liver immune cells, in turn starting a chain reaction ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.