British surgeons separate conjoined Sudanese twins

September 18, 2011

Surgeons at a British hospital have successfully separated one-year-old conjoined twins from Sudan, the charity which funded the procedure said Sunday.

Baby girls Rital and Ritag Gaboura are craniopagus twins, meaning they were born joined at the head. While conjoined twins are very rare, craniopagus twins are even rarer, and only one in ten million sufferers survive to .

One month after their separation on August 15, however, they are happy and do not appear to be suffering any from the operation, according to British charity Facing the World.

After their birth on September 22, 2010, in Khartoum, the twins' parents asked the charity to fund and organise their possible separation.

They flew to London in April, by which time Ritag's heart was already failing, and the twins were admitted the world famous Great Ormond Street Hospital.

The separation was carried out in four stages by a surgical team working for free. Two operations were performed in May, tissue expanders were inserted in July and the final separation was carried out on August 15.

"We are very thankful to be able to look forward to going home with two separate, healthy girls," said their parents, Abdelmajeed and Enas Gaboura, who are both .

"We are very grateful to all the doctors who volunteered their time and to Facing the World for organising all the and for paying for the surgery."

The surgeon who led the operation, David Dunaway, said it had presented huge challenges.

"The incidences of surviving with this condition are extremely rare. The task presented innumerable challenges and we were all very aware of our responsibilities to the family and these two little girls," he said.

"The Gaboura family have been extremely brave throughout a very stressful journey and their love for their children is clear to see."

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Best of Last Year—The top Medical Xpress articles of 2017

December 20, 2017
It was a good year for medical research as a team at the German center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Magdeburg, found that dancing can reverse the signs of aging in the brain. Any exercise helps, the team found, but dancing ...

Pickled in 'cognac', Chopin's heart gives up its secrets

November 26, 2017
The heart of Frederic Chopin, among the world's most cherished musical virtuosos, may finally have given up the cause of his untimely death.

Sugar industry withheld evidence of sucrose's health effects nearly 50 years ago

November 21, 2017
A U.S. sugar industry trade group appears to have pulled the plug on a study that was producing animal evidence linking sucrose to disease nearly 50 years ago, researchers argue in a paper publishing on November 21 in the ...

Female researchers pay more attention to sex and gender in medicine

November 7, 2017
When women participate in a medical research paper, that research is more likely to take into account the differences between the way men and women react to diseases and treatments, according to a new study by Stanford researchers.

Drug therapy from lethal bacteria could reduce kidney transplant rejection

August 3, 2017
An experimental treatment derived from a potentially deadly microorganism may provide lifesaving help for kidney transplant patients, according to an international study led by investigators at Cedars-Sinai.

Exploring the potential of human echolocation

June 25, 2017
People who are visually impaired will often use a cane to feel out their surroundings. With training and practice, people can learn to use the pitch, loudness and timbre of echoes from the cane or other sounds to navigate ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.