Mediterranean diet gives longer life

December 20, 2011

A Mediterranean diet with large amounts of vegetables and fish gives a longer life. This is the unanimous result of four studies to be published by the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg. Research studies ever since the 1950s have shown that a Mediterranean diet, based on a high consumption of fish and vegetables and a low consumption of animal-based products such as meat and milk, leads to better health.

Scientists at the Sahlgrenska Academy have now studied the effects of a on older people in Sweden. They have used a unique study known as the "H70 study" to compare 70-year-olds who eat a Mediterranean diet with others who have eaten more meat and . The H70 study has studied thousands of 70-year-olds in the Gothenburg region for more than 40 years.

The results show that those who eat a Mediterranean diet have a 20% higher chance of living longer. "This means in practice that older people who eat a Mediterranean diet live an estimated 2 3 years longer than those who don't", says Gianluca Tognon, scientist at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.

These results are supported by three further as yet unpublished studies into Mediterranean diets and their : one carried out on people in Denmark, the second on people in northern Sweden, and the third on children.

"The conclusion we can draw from these studies is that there is no doubt that a Mediterranean diet is linked to , not only for the elderly but also for youngsters", says Gianluca Tognon.

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kevinrtrs
1.3 / 5 (6) Dec 20, 2011
This new finding [or dubious conclusion ] could result in the rapid increase of the price of fish as people suddenly discover a new-found love for it. On the other hand, most of the older people I know clearly indicate that old age is not for sissies, so it's highly debatable whether living much longer than about 70 years is a good thing. I'd say simply ignore the finding, enjoy what you have and live a life full of joy and good works, no matter how short it might be.
Ethelred
5 / 5 (4) Dec 20, 2011
So does this post mean that Kevin is a sissy?

Consider the alternative Kevin. Death is so permanent.

One of the guys I work with is 75. The only reason I can think of for him not retiring is that he would be bored.

Ethelred
RobertKarlStonjek
3 / 5 (1) Dec 20, 2011
Mediterranean diet gives longer life


...but changing your diet can be fatal...
Isaacsname
5 / 5 (1) Dec 21, 2011
Med diets are more varied than something like typical American diets these days. One of my stepfathers was a Lebanese chef, I also am a chef, so..yadablahblah, but you'll find a typical Mezze to be a nice varied selection. It's based on smaller portions and more variety, moderation( lacking in America ) less processing, etc.

Eat Lebanese for a week, then switch to Mickey D's and mac-n-cheese for a week and tell me how you feel. The food is healthier, hands down. Same with most foreign cuisine.

France has Brioche, we get Wonder bread. Fat people ride moving platforms.

Go figure.

Osiris1
3 / 5 (2) Dec 26, 2011
I do not think Kevin would think that way if HE was nearing seventy and faced the prospect of a Ron Paul/tea party type president who would send machine gun toting jack booted thugs in coal bucket helmets to HIS house on his seventieth birthday to arrest him and take him to a new Dachau 'nazi' death camp....one way to 'do the 'final solution to entitlement program problem'.....

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