Plastic surgery gives younger appearance to aging face

February 21, 2012
Plastic surgery gives younger appearance to aging face
Aesthetic facial plastic surgery results in a reduction in perceived age, with the effect more substantial for those who undergo multiple procedures, according to a study published online Feb. 20 in the Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery.

(HealthDay) -- Aesthetic facial plastic surgery results in a reduction in perceived age, with the effect more substantial for those who undergo multiple procedures, according to a study published online Feb. 20 in the Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery.

Nitin Chauhan, M.D., of the University of Toronto, and colleagues evaluated the degree of perceived age change in 60 randomly selected patients aged 45 to 72 who underwent aesthetic facial . Raters were presented with photographs and asked to estimate the patients' ages. The patient population was divided into three groups: face- and neck-lift (group 1); face- and neck-lift and upper and lower blepharoplasty (group 2); and face- and neck-lift, upper and lower blepharoplasty, and forehead-lift (group 3).

The researchers found that, on average, patients' ages were estimated at about 1.7 years younger than their before surgery and 8.9 years younger after surgery. The effect was most dramatic for group 3, and less substantial for group 1.

"Our data demonstrate a significant and consistent reduction in perceived age after aesthetic facial surgery," the authors write. "This effect is made more substantial when the number of surgical procedures is increased, an effect unrelated to the preoperative age of a patient and unaffected by other variables that we investigated."

One of the authors disclosed to Allergan Canada.

More information: Abstract
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Callippo
1 / 5 (2) Feb 21, 2012
From when the plastic surgeries are made for looking older...? This "study" is just a PR presented as a "research", nothing more.
LuckyExplorer
1 / 5 (1) Feb 22, 2012
One of the most useless researches on the least important topic ever published!
Sinister1811
1.7 / 5 (6) Feb 22, 2012
Plastic surgery gives younger appearance to aging face


I thought that was the whole point of plastic surgery.
Squirrel
1 / 5 (1) Feb 22, 2012
"One of the authors disclosed financial ties to Allergan Canada." The most important sentence in the above piece.

Major methodological flaws: (1) No control over how the before and after photographs were taken. Subtle and unintended differences in facial expression and lighting could affect age judgments.
(2) In the real world people judge age (and attractiveness) upon the mobility of the face--something hidden by photographs. Botox shows that "youthfulness" can be created but only at the cost of creating unnatural facial mobility. Who wants to look like "ice cube" freak even if that makes you appear 8.9 years younger!

The paper is open access and be found here
http://archfaci.a...561.full

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