Primary care doctors fail to recognize anxiety disorders

February 22, 2012 By Katherine Kahn

(Medical Xpress) -- Primary care providers fail to recognize anxiety disorders in two-thirds of patients with symptoms, reports a new study in General Hospital Psychiatry.

is a very common condition in general practice. Patients with physical health problems and other mental disorders often have anxiety,” says the study’s lead author Anna Fernandez, Ph.D., a psychologist and researcher at the Parc Sanitari Sant Joan de Deu in Barcelona, Spain. “People suffering from anxiety are often severely disabled by the condition. Since are the gatekeepers of the healthcare system, it is very important that they recognize anxiety early on, so that patients can be referred or treated.”

Fernandez and colleagues conducted a survey of 3,815 patients who had been seen at 77 primary care centers in Spain. Patients were interviewed by psychologists and assessed for anxiety disorders. Patients were also evaluated for disability, stress, social support, quality of life, and the presence of chronic physical conditions.

Overall, about 19 percent of patients met the criteria for an anxiety disorder in the previous 12 months, but general practitioners correctly recognized anxiety in only 28 to 32 percent of these patients.

“The most important finding of our paper is that general practitioners don’t differentiate between subtypes of anxiety disorders,” Fernandez says. While 253 patients had panic disorder—a type of anxiety characterized by panic “attacks”—general practitioners correctly identified none of them and misdiagnosed 3 others as having the condition. Conversely, they also misdiagnosed general anxiety disorder—a type of anxiety characterized by ongoing, daily anxiety—in 42 patients who did not have the disorder. General practitioners were more likely to accurately recognize anxiety in patients with high blood pressure and those whose main reason for the doctor’s visit was emotional problems.

Jaesu Han, M.D., a psychiatrist at the University of California, Davis, who works with primary care residents, says that failing to identify the specific type of anxiety disorder isn’t so important, since the initial treatment of most is similar, involving medication and psychotherapy. “What’s more relevant is that general practitioners are able to recognize a clinically significant anxiety disorder,” Han says. doctors can quickly screen for anxiety using short patient questionnaires, he says.

Since the majority of patients with anxiety typically don’t act in bizarre or unusual ways, physicians may not always appreciate the impact anxiety has on ’ lives, says Han. “When studies have followed people with anxiety over time, it’s been shown that anxiety is very burdensome,” Han says. “In the majority of cases, anxiety persists for many, many years. It is often a chronic condition that waxes and wanes, and can wreak havoc,” on a person’s ability to work and socialize.

Explore further: Research finds children with social phobia are judged less attractive

More information: Fernandez A., Rubio-Valera M., Bellon J., et al. (2012). “Recognition of anxiety disorders by the general practitioner. Results from the DASMAP study." General Hospital Psychiatry, In Press.

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Talk to babies and let them babble back to bridge word gap

February 18, 2017

Even infants can have conversations with mom or dad. Their turn just tends to involve a smile or some gibberish instead of words. That's a key lesson from programs that are coaching parents to talk more with their babies—and ...

What the ability to 'get the gist' says about your brain

February 17, 2017

Many who have a chronic traumatic brain injury (TBI) report struggling to solve problems, understand complex information and maintain friendships, despite scoring normally on cognitive tests. New research from the Center ...

Emotions are cognitive, not innate, researchers conclude

February 15, 2017

Emotions are not innately programmed into our brains, but, in fact, are cognitive states resulting from the gathering of information, New York University Professor Joseph LeDoux and Richard Brown, a professor at the City ...

People are found to be inefficient when searching for things

February 15, 2017

(Medical Xpress)—A trio of researchers at the University of Aberdeen in the U.K. has found that when people scan areas looking for something in particular, they tend to do so in a very inefficient manner. In their paper ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.