Study finds that red blood cell transfusion decreases fatigue in women with acute postpartum anemia

February 10, 2012, Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine

In a study to be presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in Dallas, Texas, researchers will report findings that show that in women with acute postpartum anemia, due to excessive blood loss during delivery, red blood cell transfusion led to a statistically significant decrease in physical fatigue. While excessive blood loss during delivery caused severe physical fatigue, the effect of red blood cell transfusion on this fatigue was small.

This study, RBC Transfusion Leads to an Improvement of Physical Fatigue in with Acute Postpartum Anemia: the WOMB Study, is the first study worldwide to investigate the blood transfusion policy among postpartum women, a very specific population of mostly healthy, young women who develop an acute anemia due to postpartum hemorrhage.

"We believe that the difference in physical fatigue between blood transfusion and expectant management, i.e. no transfusion, is clinically acceptable and expectant management should therefore be preferred," said Johannes J. Duvekot, MD, PhD, with Erasmus MC, Obstetrics & Gynecology, Rotterdam, Netherlands, and one of the study's authors. "Blood transfusion should be given based on clinical symptoms and not on blood values only."

Duvekot and his colleagues investigated whether a red blood cell transfusion improved physical fatigue in postpartum anemic women, due to excessive during delivery, without severe physical complaints. Women who participated in the Netherlands nationwide study were randomly allocated to red blood cell transfusion or expectant management. They were followed for six weeks, in which they reported on their quality of life, including physical fatigue, by completing questionnaires.

The results of the study show that excessive blood loss during delivery caused severe physical fatigue. Red only mildly improved this fatigue. Therefore, in patients with acute anemia due to postpartum hemorrhage, who are hemodynamically stable, an expectant management is preferred.

Explore further: Transfusion not always best treatment for anemia, age of stored blood may play a role

More information: A copy of the abstract is available at www.smfmnewsroom.org/annual-me … 1-meeting-abstracts/

Related Stories

Transfusion not always best treatment for anemia, age of stored blood may play a role

October 12, 2011
University of Kentucky researchers, including lead author Samy Selim of the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine and the Saha Cardiovascular Research Center, have recently published a paper suggesting that transfusion may ...

Recommended for you

A new theory on reducing cardiovascular disease risk in binge drinkers

January 23, 2018
A new study shows that binge drinkers have increased levels of a biomarker molecule—microRNA-21—that may contribute to poor vascular function.

Flu infection study increases understanding of natural immunity

January 23, 2018
People with higher levels of antibodies against the stem portion of the influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) protein have less viral shedding when they get the flu, but do not have fewer or less severe signs of illness, according ...

New long-acting approach for malaria therapy developed

January 22, 2018
A new study, published in Nature Communications, conducted by the University of Liverpool and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine highlights a new 'long acting' medicine for the prevention of malaria.

Virus shown to be likely cause of mystery polio-like illness

January 22, 2018
A major review by UNSW researchers has identified strong evidence that a virus called Enterovirus D68 is the cause of a mystery polio-like illness that has paralysed children in the US, Canada and Europe.

Creation of synthetic horsepox virus could lead to more effective smallpox vaccine

January 19, 2018
UAlberta researchers created a new synthetic virus that could lead to the development of a more effective vaccine against smallpox. The discovery demonstrates how techniques based on the use of synthetic DNA can be used to ...

Study ends debate over role of steroids in treating septic shock

January 19, 2018
The results from the largest ever study of septic shock could improve treatment for critically ill patients and save health systems worldwide hundreds of millions of dollars each year.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.