Lower limb muscle limitations hamper walking in diabetes

May 30, 2012
Lower limb muscle limitations hamper walking in diabetes

(HealthDay) -- In older adults, diabetes correlates with slower walking speed, and diabetes-linked reductions in muscle strength and worse muscle quality contribute to these walking limitations, according to a study published online May 17 in Diabetes Care.

Stefano Volpato, M.D., M.P.H., from the University of Ferrara in Italy, and colleagues conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 835 participants (aged 65 years old and older; , 11.4 percent) enrolled in a population-based study. Peripheral quantitative was used to assess total, muscular, and fat cross-sectional areas of the calf and relative muscle density. Knee extension torque, ankle plantar flexion and dorsiflexion strength, lower extremity muscle power, and ankle muscle quality were used as indicators of muscle performance. Gait was measured by the 4-m and 400-m tests.

The researchers found that participants with diabetes had significantly lower muscle density, knee and ankle strength, and muscle power, as well as worse muscle quality, after adjustment for age and gender. Participants with diabetes were significantly slower on both the 4-m and 400-m walking tests. In the 4-m and 400-m tests, lower limb muscle characteristics accounted for 24.3 and 15.1 percent, respectively, of the difference in the walking speed between individuals with and without diabetes.

"In older persons, diabetes is associated with reduced muscle strength and worse muscle quality," the authors write.

Explore further: Older men with higher testosterone levels lose less muscle mass as they age

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)


Related Stories

Older men with higher testosterone levels lose less muscle mass as they age

October 27, 2011
A recent study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM) found that higher levels of testosterone were associated with reduced loss of lean muscle mass in older ...

Fewer mitochondria in offspring of parents with diabetes

March 26, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Normal-weight, insulin-resistant individuals whose parents have type 2 diabetes have fewer mitochondria in their muscles due to lower expression of lipoprotein lipase (LPL), according to a study published in ...

Better understanding arthritis

May 2, 2012
Better arthritis treatment could be one step closer with research showing muscle inflammation outside joints as much to blame for discomfort and poor mobility in sufferers as inflammation of the joint itself.

Increased muscle mass may lower risk of pre-diabetes

July 28, 2011
A recent study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM) found that the greater an individual's total muscle mass, the lower the person's risk of having insulin ...

Recommended for you

Diabetes gene found that causes low and high blood sugar levels in the same family

January 15, 2018
A study of families with rare blood sugar conditions has revealed a new gene thought to be critical in the regulation of insulin, the key hormone in diabetes.

Discovery could lead to new therapies for diabetics

January 12, 2018
New research by MDI Biological Laboratory scientist Sandra Rieger, Ph.D., and her team has demonstrated that an enzyme she had previously identified as playing a role in peripheral neuropathy induced by cancer chemotherapy ...

Enzyme shown to regulate inflammation and metabolism in fat tissue

January 11, 2018
The human body has two primary kinds of fat—white fat, which stores excess calories and is associated with obesity, and brown fat, which burns calories in order to produce heat and has garnered interest as a potential means ...

Big strides made in diabetes care

January 5, 2018
(HealthDay)—This past year was a busy, productive one for diabetes research and care.

Gene therapy restores normal blood glucose levels in mice with type 1 diabetes

January 4, 2018
Type 1 diabetes is a chronic disease in which the immune system attacks and destroys insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas, resulting in high blood levels of glucose. A study published January 4th in Cell Stem Cell ...

Goodbye, needles? Patch might be the future for blood-sugar tracking

January 4, 2018
(HealthDay)—Developers of a new patch hope to eliminate a big barrier in type 2 diabetes treatment—painful finger-sticks and injections. The new patch—which actually uses an array of tiny needles that researchers promise ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.