One-fifth of healthy middle-aged men have low-grade murmur

May 25, 2012
One-Fifth of healthy middle-Aged men have low-Grade murmur

(HealthDay) -- More than one-fifth of healthy middle-aged men have a low-grade systolic heart murmur that confers a nearly five-fold higher risk of future aortic valve replacement (AVR), according to a study published in the June issue of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

Johan Bodegard, M.D., Ph.D., of the Oslo University Hospital in Norway, and colleagues conducted a study involving 2,014 healthy Norwegian men, aged 40 to 59 years, who underwent heart auscultation to detect systolic heart murmur along with other standard between 1972 and 1975. Of these, 1,541 (76.5 percent) had no heart murmur, 441 (21.9 percent) had a low-grade (grade I/II) murmur, and 32 (1.6 percent) had a moderate (grade III/IV) murmur. Patients were followed for up to 35 years to determine whether the presence of a low-grade systolic murmur was associated with an increased long-term risk of AVR or (CVD) mortality.

The researchers found that men with a low-grade systolic murmur had a 4.7-fold increased age-related risk of AVR, but no increased risk of mortality due to CVD. Men with a moderate-grade systolic murmur had an 89.3-fold increased risk of AVR and a 1.5-fold, but not statistically significant, increased risk of death due to CVD.

"Low-grade systolic murmur was found in more than one-fifth of apparently healthy middle-aged men with normal ," the authors write. "Men with low-grade systolic murmur have a late development of AVR requirement, and we suggest that an auscultatory follow-up at five years could safely replace an immediate referral for echocardiography."

Explore further: Middle-aged men with upper-normal blood pressure at risk for AF

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)


Related Stories

Middle-aged men with upper-normal blood pressure at risk for AF

January 17, 2012
Middle-aged men at the upper end of normal blood pressure had an elevated risk for atrial fibrillation later in life, according to new research in Hypertension: Journal of the American Heart Association.

Diastolic dysfunction of the heart associated with increased risk of death

June 27, 2011
Individuals with diastolic dysfunction (an abnormality involving impaired relaxation of the heart's ventricle [pumping chamber] after a contraction) appear to have an increased risk of death, regardless of whether their systolic ...

Cardiovascular disease risk of high normal blood pressure decreases in old age

April 20, 2012
High normal blood pressure becomes less of a risk factor for incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) and coronary heart disease (CHD) with age, according to a new study presented today at the World Congress of Cardiology.

Recommended for you

Research suggests new pathways for hyperaldosteronism

December 7, 2017
A new study led by researchers at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP), in collaboration with researchers at Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, part of the ...

One-dose gene therapy produces clotting factor, safely stops bleeding in hemophilia B patients

December 6, 2017
A team of gene therapy researchers has reported positive results in a phase 1/2 clinical trial for the inherited bleeding disorder hemophilia B. A single intravenous infusion of a novel bioengineered gene therapy treatment ...

Clot-busting drugs not recommended for most patients with blood clots

December 6, 2017
Not all patients with blood clots in their legs - a condition known as deep vein thrombosis - need to receive powerful but risky clot-busting drugs, according to results of a large-scale, multicenter clinical trial.

Mitochondrial protein in cardiac muscle cells linked to heart failure, study finds

December 5, 2017
Reducing a protein found in the mitochondria of cardiac muscle cells initiates cardiac dysfunction and heart failure, a finding that could provide insight for new treatments for cardiovascular diseases, a study led by Georgia ...

Blood pressure declines 14 to 18 years before death

December 4, 2017
Blood pressure in the elderly gradually begins to decrease about 14 or so years before death, according to a new study published today in the JAMA Internal Medicine.

Study links common male medical condition and vascular disease

December 1, 2017
Men who suffer symptoms from varicoceles, enlarged veins in the scrotum, are more likely to develop vascular disease and metabolic disease, such as diabetes, according to a study by Stanford University School of Medicine ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.