Survey finds many Americans nodding off away from bed

May 2, 2012

Forty-five percent of Americans fall asleep somewhere other than their bed at least once a week, a survey by a mattress industry group found Tuesday.

Men are more likely than women to nod off away from their beds, according to the nationwide survey of 1,000 adults for the Better Sleep Council, which Tuesday declared May to be "Better Sleep Month."

One in 10 respondents acknowledged dozing off at work, it said. Seven percent fell asleep at church, six percent on public transportation and four percent on the toilet.

"We were stunned by some of the survey responses," said Karin Mahoney, spokeswoman for the Better Sleep Council, the consumer education wing of the International Sleep Products Association, in a statement.

"One man fell asleep on a rooftop," she said. "Another man fell asleep while interviewing a job candidate. There was a teacher who fell asleep at the podium in front of her class."

The same , with a margin of error of three percent, also found that six in 10 Americans "crave more than sex" -- with an undisclosed number admitting to falling asleep while making love.

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