Many still tanning, despite dangers, survey finds

May 28, 2012
Many still tanning, despite dangers, survey finds
Under-30s most likely to use tanning beds or sunbathe, online poll suggests.

(HealthDay) -- Despite public education efforts, many young adults still don't understand the dangers of sun exposure and tanning, a new U.S. survey finds.

The nationwide online survey conducted by the American Academy of Dermatology found that 58 percent of respondents aged 18 to 29 believe people look more attractive with a tan, and 71 percent agreed with the statement: " is good for your health."

In the past year, about 40 percent of respondents in that age group tried to get a tan by using a tanning bed, spending time in the sun, using a self-tanner, or getting a spray tan. The survey also found that one-quarter of respondents aged 18 to 29 were unsure if sun exposure can cause wrinkles.

"Our survey showed that age was highly associated with tanning, as the respondents under age 30 were more likely to use tanning beds and spend time in the sun," dermatologist Dr. Zoe Draelos said in an academy news release. "Ultimately, seeking to change the color of your skin is self-defeating because exposure to -- either through tanning beds or by seeking the sun -- can lead to wrinkles, prematurely aging skin and even a diagnosis of skin cancer."

In order to encourage young women to embrace their natural skin color, the academy produced a television public service announcement that asks women to stop tanning. The academy has also launched a new SPOT Skin Cancer public awareness initiative that focuses on how people can protect themselves from skin cancer.

"The academy is committed to raising awareness of skin cancer prevention and helping young women understand that a tan is not beautiful, but a sign of irreversible ," Draelos said. "If you want to be tan, use a spray tan -- which is a safe alternative to by artificial or natural ultraviolet light."

Melanoma, the most deadly form of cancer, is the most common cancer for Americans aged 25 to 29, and the second most common cancer among those aged 15 to 29. Using increases the risk of melanoma, especially in women aged 45 or younger.

May is Melanoma/ Detection and Prevention Month.

Explore further: Resist temptation to tan, despite winter doldrums

More information: The U.S. National Cancer Institute has more about skin cancer prevention.


Related Stories

Resist temptation to tan, despite winter doldrums

December 30, 2011
(Medical Xpress) -- Don’t let winter’s lack of sunshine lure you into a tanning bed. 

Increased tanning bed use increases risk for deadly skin cancers

October 24, 2011
Researchers confirmed an association between tanning bed use and an increased risk for three common skin cancers — basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma, according to results presented at the 10th ...

Tanning beds could provide a greater risk than originally thought: new study

October 10, 2011
(Medical Xpress) -- A new study published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology has found that, despite previous information, the UVA radiation used in tanning beds may cause more damage to the skin that was originally ...

Recommended for you

High-fat diet in pregnancy can cause mental health problems in offspring

July 21, 2017
A high-fat diet not only creates health problems for expectant mothers, but new research in an animal model suggests it alters the development of the brain and endocrine system of their offspring and has a long-term impact ...

To combat teen smoking, health experts recommend R ratings for movies that depict tobacco use

July 21, 2017
Public health experts have an unusual suggestion for reducing teen smoking: Give just about any movie that depicts tobacco use an automatic R rating.

Opioids and obesity, not 'despair deaths,' raising mortality rates for white Americans

July 20, 2017
Drug-related deaths among middle-aged white men increased more than 25-fold between 1980 and 2014, with the bulk of that spike occurring since the mid-1990s when addictive prescription opioids became broadly available, according ...

Aging Americans enjoy longer life, better health when avoiding three risky behaviors

July 20, 2017
We've heard it before from our doctors and other health experts: Keep your weight down, don't smoke and cut back on the alcohol if you want to live longer.

Parents have critical role in preventing teen drinking

July 20, 2017
Fewer teenagers are drinking alcohol but more needs to be done to curb the drinking habits of Australian school students, based on the findings of the latest study by Adelaide researchers.

Fresh fish oil lowers diabetes risk in rat offspring

July 19, 2017
Fresh fish oil given to overweight pregnant rats prevented their offspring from developing a major diabetes risk factor, Auckland researchers have found.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.