Weight loss led to reduction in inflammation

Postmenopausal women who were overweight or obese and lost at least 5 percent of their body weight had a measurable reduction in markers of inflammation, according to a study published in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

"Both obesity and have been shown to be related to several types of cancer, and this study shows that if you reduce weight, you can reduce inflammation as well," said Anne McTiernan, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Prevention Center at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Wash.

Women in the trial who were assigned to a weight loss intervention had a goal of 10 percent weight reduction during the course of one year achieved through a diet intervention with or without .

"So this program was highly achievable and reproducible. We are not talking about drastic weight loss," said McTiernan.

The researchers measured levels of C-reactive protein, A, interleukin-6, leukocyte and in 439 women.

At the end of one year, C-reactive protein reduced by 36.1 percent in the diet-alone group and by 41.7 percent in the diet and exercise group. Interleukin-6 decreased by 23.1 percent in the diet group and 24.3 percent in the diet and exercise group.

McTiernan and colleagues found a mild dose response, as there were greater reductions in these measures among women who lost at least 5 percent of their body weight. They also found that exercise alone, without a dietary component, had little effect on inflammation markers.

"This study adds to the growing understanding we have about the link between obesity and cancer, and it appears we can affect inflammation directly through nonpharmaceutical means," said McTiernan.


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Citation: Weight loss led to reduction in inflammation (2012, May 1) retrieved 19 July 2019 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-05-weight-loss-reduction-inflammation.html
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