AHS: changes in weather can trigger mild migraines

June 20, 2012
AHS: changes in weather can trigger mild migraines
For patients with migraines, 20.9 percent of incident mild headaches can be explained by temperature changes; and most red-wine-sensitive migraineurs do not experience migraine every time they drink red wine, according to two studies presented at the annual meeting of the American Headache Society, held from June 21 to 24 in Los Angeles.

(HealthDay) -- For patients with migraines, 20.9 percent of incident mild headaches can be explained by temperature changes; and most red-wine-sensitive migraineurs do not experience migraine every time they drink red wine, according to two studies presented at the annual meeting of the American Headache Society, held from June 21 to 24 in Los Angeles.

Shuu-Jiun Wang, M.D., from the Taipei Veterans Hospital in Taiwan, and colleagues investigated the temporal relationship between weather and headache incidence in 66 patients with migraine, including 34 who reported sensitivity to temperature changes. The researchers found that, in the winter, temperature explained 16.5 percent of the variance of headache incidence, while in the summer, it accounted for 9.6 percent. For patients with self-reported , in winter, the explained variance increased to 29.2 percent. accounted for 20.9 and 4.8 percent, respectively, of incident mild and moderate-to-severe headaches.

Abouch V. Krymchantowski, M.D., Ph.D., and Carla C. Jevoux, M.D., Ph.D., from the Headache Center of Rio in Brazil, assessed whether different varieties of red wine have distinct effects in migraine. Forty regular red-wine drinkers who mentioned an association between wine and migraine drank four different half-bottles of within an interval of at least four days and completed a headache calendar. The authors found that, of the 33 patients who completed the study, 87.8, 54.5, and 33.4 percent of participants had a at least once, on at least two occasions, or on all four occasions, respectively. Tannat and Malbec varieties triggered migraine more frequently (51.7 and 48.2 percent, respectively).

"It is possible that different varieties of red wines with different content of tannins and resveratrol can trigger migraine differently," Krymchantowski said in a statement.

Explore further: The association of alcohol drinking with migraine headache

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