ASCO: Continuing avastin with 2nd-line chemo ups survival

June 5, 2012
ASCO: continuing avastin with 2nd-Line chemo ups survival
Continuing use of bevacizumab (Avastin) in combination with second-line chemotherapy improves overall survival and progression-free survival in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who have progressed after discontinuation of first-line bevacizumab and chemotherapy, according to the results of a phase III study presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, held from June 1 to 5 in Chicago.

(HealthDay) -- Continuing use of bevacizumab (Avastin) in combination with second-line chemotherapy improves overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) who have progressed after discontinuation of first-line bevacizumab and chemotherapy, according to the results of a phase III study presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, held from June 1 to 5 in Chicago.

Dirk Arnold, M.D., from the University Clinic Eppendorf in Hamburg, Germany, and colleagues randomized 820 patients with unresectable, histologically-confirmed mCRC, who had progressed within three months after discontinuation of first-line bevacizumab plus chemotherapy, to receive second-line fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy with bevacizumab (2.5 mg/kg/week equivalent; 409 patients) or without bevacizumab (411 patients). The choice of oxaliplatin- or irinotecan-based second-line chemotherapy was dependent on the regimen used in first-line treatment.

The researchers found that the median OS was significantly longer in those receiving bevacizumab and chemotherapy, compared to those receiving only chemotherapy (11.2 versus 9.8 months; hazard ratio [HR], 0.81), as was median PFS (5.7 versus 4.1 months; HR, 0.68). The adverse event profile was similar to previously reported data for bevacizumab and chemotherapy. When compared with historical data from bevacizumab treatment in first- and second-line mCRC treatment, bevacizumab-related adverse events were not increased by continuing treatment beyond progression.

"By simply switching when the cancer progresses and continuing with bevacizumab, we can make second-line treatment even more powerful," Arnold said in a statement. "This finding will likely spur research into other cancer types that are sensitive to both bevacizumab and chemotherapy."

Several authors disclosed to pharmaceutical companies, including Genentech/Roche, the manufacturer of bevacizumab.

Explore further: Drug cocktail boosts ovarian cancer survival time

More information: Abstract
More Information

Related Stories

Drug cocktail boosts ovarian cancer survival time

June 2, 2012
A drug cocktail that combines chemotherapy with Avastin was shown to double the amount of time patients lived without progression of ovarian cancer, according to research released Saturday.

Bevacizumab active in HIV-linked Kaposi's sarcoma

March 20, 2012
(HealthDay) -- For patients with HIV-associated Kaposi's sarcoma (HIV-KS), bevacizumab is tolerated and induces a response in some patients, according to a study published online March 19 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Bevacizumab doesn't up overall survival in prostate cancer

March 27, 2012
(HealthDay) -- For men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), the addition of bevacizumab (B) to docetaxel plus prednisone (DP) is not associated with improved overall survival (OS), but does improve ...

New drug combination slows tumor growth for recurrent ovarian cancer

June 6, 2011
Bevacizumab (Avastin) in combination with chemotherapy resulted in a clinical benefit for patients with recurrent ovarian cancer, according to a new study. Results from the phase III "OCEANS" trial were presented today by ...

Recommended for you

Lung cancer triggers pulmonary hypertension

November 17, 2017
Shortness of breath and respiratory distress often increase the suffering of advanced-stage lung cancer patients. These symptoms can be triggered by pulmonary hypertension, as scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Heart ...

Computer program finds new uses for old drugs

November 16, 2017
Researchers at the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have developed a computer program to find new indications for old drugs. The computer program, called DrugPredict, ...

Researchers discover an Achilles heel in a lethal leukemia

November 16, 2017
Researchers have discovered how a linkage between two proteins in acute myeloid leukemia enables cancer cells to resist chemotherapy and showed that disrupting the linkage could render the cells vulnerable to treatment. St. ...

Pharmacoscopy improves therapy for relapsed blood cancer in a first clinical trial

November 16, 2017
Researchers at CeMM and the Medical University of Vienna presented a preliminary report in The Lancet Hematology on the clinical impact of an integrated ex vivo approach called pharmacoscopy. The procedures measure single-cell ...

Wider sampling of tumor tissues may guide drug choice, improve outcomes

November 15, 2017
A new study focused on describing genetic variations within a primary tumor, differences between the primary and a metastatic branch of that tumor, and additional diversity found in tumor DNA in the blood stream could help ...

A new strategy for prevention of liver cancer development

November 14, 2017
Primary liver cancer is now the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, and its incidences and mortality are increasing rapidly in the United Stated. In late stages of the malignancy, there are no effective ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.