More bone grafts, screws tied to less spinal reconstruction stress

June 1, 2012
More bone grafts, screws tied to less spinal reconstruction stress
Increasing the number of bone grafts and screws used for fusing multiple cervical spine segments yields a more stable construct that decreases the stresses at the graft end plate and bone-screw interfaces, according to a study published online May 10 in The Spine Journal.

(HealthDay) -- Increasing the number of bone grafts and screws used for fusing multiple cervical spine segments yields a more stable construct that decreases the stresses at the graft end plate and bone-screw interfaces, according to a study published online May 10 in The Spine Journal.

Mozammil Hussain, Ph.D., from Logan University in Chesterfield, Mo., and colleagues utilized a modified version of a previously validated C3 to T1 intact finite element model to evaluate the stability of fusion constructs from three different multilevel anterior C4 to C7 fusion models. The models were a two-level corpectomy alone (one graft and four screws with two unicortical screws placed parallel to the corresponding end plates inside the vertebral bodies C4 and C7); a corpectomy-discectomy (two grafts and six screws placed at C4, C6, and C7); and a three-level discectomy alone (three grafts and eight screws placed at C4, C5, C6, and C7).

The researchers found that, although total motion of the reconstruction decreased with an increasing number of and screws, there was no significant variation between the reconstruction techniques. As a result of increasing the number of bone grafts and screws there was a decrease in the stresses in the bone grafts, end plates, and bone near screws.

"Although the chances of pseudarthrosis have been shown to be lower after multilevel cervical corpectomy versus discectomy, because of fewer interfaces required for healing, this benefit should be weighed against the higher bone-screw stresses, operating time, , and costs associated with corpectomy," the authors write.

Several authors disclosed to medical device companies.

Explore further: Study finds posterior C1 fixation to be safe, accurate

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Study finds posterior C1 fixation to be safe, accurate

April 6, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Posterior C1 screw fixation can be performed safely and accurately, without significant hemorrhaging, according to a study published in the March issue of The Spine Journal.

Smart materials that get bone to heal

November 4, 2011
Bone tissue is very good at self-healing, but in many situations the natural healing process is not sufficient. In a dissertation at Uppsala University, Sonya Piskounova shows how functional materials that she and her colleagues ...

Building bone from cartilage

February 14, 2012
A person has a tumor removed from her femur. A soldier is struck by an improvised explosive device and loses a portion of his tibia. A child undergoes chemotherapy for osteosarcoma but part of the bone dies as a result.

Recommended for you

Study ends debate over role of steroids in treating septic shock

January 19, 2018
The results from the largest ever study of septic shock could improve treatment for critically ill patients and save health systems worldwide hundreds of millions of dollars each year.

New approach could help curtail hospitalizations due to influenza infection

January 18, 2018
More than 700,000 Americans were hospitalized due to illnesses associated with the seasonal flu during the 2014-15 flu season, according to federal estimates. A radical new approach to vaccine development at UCLA may help ...

Zika virus damages placenta, which may explain malformed babies

January 18, 2018
Though the Zika virus is widely known for a recent outbreak that caused children to be born with microencephaly, or having a small head, and other malformations, scientists have struggled to explain how the virus affects ...

Certain flu virus mutations may compensate for fitness costs of other mutations

January 18, 2018
Seasonal flu viruses continually undergo mutations that help them evade the human immune system, but some of these mutations can reduce a virus's potency. According to new research published in PLOS Pathogens, certain mutations ...

Study reveals how MRSA infection compromises lymphatic function

January 17, 2018
Infections of the skin or other soft tissues with the hard-to-treat MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) bacteria appear to permanently compromise the lymphatic system, which is crucial to immune system function. ...

Fresh approach to tuberculosis vaccine offers better protection

January 17, 2018
A unique platform that resulted in a promising HIV vaccine has also led to a new, highly effective vaccine against tuberculosis that is moving toward testing in humans.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.