Cheaper AMD drug could lead to serious eye issues

June 18, 2012, Queen's University

A Queen's University study of two eye drugs used to treat wet Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) has determined the cheaper of the two could lead to eye inflammation, a potentially blinding adverse effect.

"This is a very important finding," says Sanjay Sharma ( and Epidemiology), a noted AMD and researcher who also practices at Hotel Dieu Hospital. "It is particularly important because many seniors need numerous injections so the risk is cumulative."

AMD is the leading cause of severe visual loss and in Canada. It is linked to depression, falls and higher rates of nursing home admissions.

The research reviewed cases of patients who received consecutive injections of either the more expensive or the cheaper version of the drug. Patients receiving the cheaper drug had a 12 times higher risk of serious eye inflammation and some patients also lost their sight, according to the study.

Many provincial governments are considering the use of the cheaper drug to help curb spiraling costs. The more expensive drug retails for $1,800 while the cheaper version is one-tenth of that price.

Explore further: Novartis tries to make UK hospitals use $1000 drug

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