Experimental drug helps diabetes patients lose weight

June 25, 2012

An experimental drug helped significantly more overweight patients with diabetes shed pounds, compared with placebo, a new study finds. The results will be presented at The Endocrine Society's 94th Annual Meeting in Houston.

"This new medication is promising because of the amount of weight loss it produces, the resultant improvement in important risk factors for diabetes, and, particularly in the lower dose studied, in its tolerability," said study lead author Donna H. Ryan, M.D., professor emeritus at Pennington Biomedical Research Center (LSU System) in Baton Rouge, LA.

Diabetes treatment involves weight management and medications to control blood-sugar levels and risk factors. If left untreated, diabetes can increase the danger of developing heart and blood-vessel diseases. Since one of the main risk factors for all of these diseases is obesity, weight loss is important to both prevention and treatment.

Focusing on , investigators found that patients who took the experimental weight-loss drug phentermine/topiramate, combined with diet and exercise modifications, were more likely to lose moderate amounts of weight than those who received a sugar-pill placebo and the diet and exercise intervention.

The percentage of study participants losing more than 10 percent of their initial weight while decreasing their blood pressure and , was:

  • 14 percent on low-dose phentermine/topiramate
  • 31 percent on high-dose phentermine/topiramate
  • 4 percent on placebo

Phentermine/topiramate is a combined medication that works by decreasing appetite. The main side effects associated with the drug were constipation and tingling sensations in the fingers. Patients who took phentermine/topiramate were also more likely to develop than those who received placebo.

This study was an analysis of diabetic patients who enrolled in weight-loss studies testing medications given with lifestyle intervention. Investigators randomly assigned 357 patients with type 2 to receive either low-dose phentermine/topiramate (7.5 milligrams), high-dose phentermine/topiramate (15 milligrams), or placebo. Neither investigators nor patients knew who was receiving the drug versus placebo in the double-blinded study. Participants' average age was 53 years, 66 percent were female, most were white, and their average weight was 222 pounds. Follow-up was one year.

Explore further: Experimental drug achieves unprecedented weight loss

Related Stories

Experimental drug achieves unprecedented weight loss

April 11, 2011
An investigational combination of drugs already approved to treat obesity, migraine and epilepsy produced up to a 10 percent weight loss in obese individuals participating in a one-year clinical trial, according to researchers ...

ECO: New weight loss drug effective in advanced obesity

May 14, 2012
(HealthDay) -- A new combination treatment of controlled-release phentermine/topiramate (PHEN/TPM CR) leads to significantly greater weight loss than a placebo even in individuals with significant obesity-related comorbidities, ...

Topiramate may have benefit as a weight-loss drug

June 6, 2011
The drug topiramate can help people lose weight as long as they can tolerate the side effects, according to authors of a new study that reviewed the medical literature. Brazilian researchers will present the results Saturday ...

Liraglutide with insulin improves poorly controlled Type 1 diabetes

June 25, 2012
Obese adults with poorly controlled Type 1 diabetes can better control their blood sugar by adding liraglutide, a Type 2 diabetes drug, to their insulin therapy, a new study finds. The results, which will be presented at ...

New type 2 diabetes drug helps lower blood sugar: study

March 20, 2012
(HealthDay) -- A new type of medication for type 2 diabetes helps to lower blood sugar levels when used in concert with insulin and other diabetes drugs, new research suggests.

Recommended for you

Cancer drugs' high prices not justified by cost of development, study contends

September 12, 2017
(HealthDay)— Excusing the sky-high price tags of many new cancer treatments, pharmaceutical companies often blame high research and development (R&D) costs.

Non-psychotropic cannabinoids show promise for pain relief

September 4, 2017
Some cancers love bone. They thrive in its nutrient-rich environment while gnawing away at the very substrate that sustains them, all the while releasing inflammatory substances that cause pain—pain so severe that opioids ...

Fentanyl drives rise in opioid-linked deaths in U.S.

August 31, 2017
(HealthDay)—Fentanyl, a synthetic narcotic, is a key player in America's continuing epidemic of opioid-related overdose deaths, two new studies report.

Eating triggers endorphin release in the brain

August 28, 2017
Finnish researchers have revealed how eating stimulates brain's endogenous opioid system to signal pleasure and satiety.

Cholesterol-lowering drugs may fight infectious disease

August 21, 2017
That statin you've been taking to lower your risk of heart attack or stroke may one day pull double duty, providing protection against a whole host of infectious diseases, including typhoid fever, chlamydia, and malaria.

Data revealed under FOI shows benefits of multiple sclerosis drug currently blocked by regulators

August 17, 2017
A drug that is blocked by the EU regulatory system has now been found to improve the quality of life of people with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a study by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.