We are drinking too much water: expert

June 5, 2012

Our bodies need about two litres of fluids per day, not two litres of water specifically. In an Editorial in the June issue of Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, Spero Tsindos from La Trobe University, examined why we consume so much water.

Mr Tsindos believes that encouraging people to drink more water is driven by vested interests, rather than a need for . "Thirty years ago you didn't see a plastic water bottle anywhere, now they appear as fashion accessories."

"As tokens of instant gratification and symbolism, the very bottle itself is seen as cool and hip," said Mr Tsindos. He also discusses the role of water in our constant quest for weight loss. "Drinking large amounts of water does not alone cause weight loss. A low-calorie diet is also required."

"Research has also revealed that water in food eaten has a greater benefit in than avoiding foods altogether. We should be telling people that beverages like tea and coffee contribute to a person's fluid needs and despite their caffeine content, do not lead to dehydration."

"We need to maintain fluid balance and should drink water, but also consider fluid in unprocessed and juices."

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winthrom
1 / 5 (1) Jun 06, 2012
This article is essentially a voice of reason in the market driven exploited field of drinking water. The "unsafe tap water" rumor is another aspect of the marketing of plastic bottle water. Food and various table drinks are (and have been) sufficient for millenia. Expect no changes in public behavior since (as stated in the article) '... encouraging people to drink more water is driven by vested interests, rather than a need for better health. "Thirty years ago you didn't see a plastic water bottle anywhere, now they appear as fashion accessories."'

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