More than 9-in-10 ED patients who receive CT of the abdomen and pelvis are clinically complex

June 1, 2012, American College of Radiology

The overwhelming majority (93.8 percent) of patients undergoing computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis (CTAP) in the emergency department (ED) setting are classified as clinically complex, according to a study in the June issue of the Journal of the American College of Radiology. Clinically complex is used to describe patients who are, based on documentation of their ED physician, much sicker than others.

Increasing has validated the utility of CTAP in a variety of . As a result, the utilization of CTAP has increased in recent years, in both the ED and a variety of other settings, resulting in questions regarding the appropriateness of its utilization.

"Understanding the complexity of patient encounters in which advanced medical imaging services are frequently delivered might be useful in aiding payers and policymakers in explaining the growth of services over the past decade and determining the context in which these examinations are appropriately being used," said Richard Duszak, Jr., MD, co-author of the study.

Using the CMS five percent Medicare files for 2007, ED visits for Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries were identified. Contemporaneous ED physician evaluation and management codes were used as the basis for patient complexity categorization. Encounters in which CTAP was performed on the same date of service were identified, and variables affecting the utilization of CTAP were analyzed.

Results showed that of 1,081,000 ED encounters, 306, 401 (28.3 percent) were of lower complexity and 774, 599 (71.7 percent) were of higher complexity. CT of the abdomen and was performed in 65,273 of all encounters (6.0 percent), corresponding to 4,069 (1.3 percent) of lower complexity and 61,204 (7.9 percent) of higher complexity encounters. Of the 65,273 encounters associated with CTAP, 61,204 (93.8 percent) were of higher complexity.

"The utilization of advanced in the ED setting serves many valuable roles. CT of the abdomen and pelvis can facilitate patient triage, decrease ED patient waiting times, decrease hospital lengths of stay and reduce the need for exploratory surgery. These outcomes would favor a preferential role for CTAP in sicker and more complex patients, and our results support that belief," said Duszak.

Explore further: Medicare and Medicaid CT scan measure is unreliable: study

Related Stories

Medicare and Medicaid CT scan measure is unreliable: study

February 23, 2012
Researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) have published findings that question the reliability of a new Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) quality measure. The study, "Assessment of Medicare's Imaging ...

Use of CT scans in emergency rooms increased 330 percent in 12 years

August 10, 2011
A review of national data from 1996 through 2007 reveals a sharp uptick in the use of computed tomography, or CT, scans to diagnose illnesses in emergency departments, a University of Michigan Health System study finds. The ...

Study examines impact of Massachusetts health law on emergency department visits

June 6, 2011
While overall emergency department use in Massachusetts continues to rise, the number of low-severity visits dropped slightly since the implementation of the state's health care reform law, according to an Annals of Emergency ...

Recommended for you

Best of Last Year—The top Medical Xpress articles of 2017

December 20, 2017
It was a good year for medical research as a team at the German center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Magdeburg, found that dancing can reverse the signs of aging in the brain. Any exercise helps, the team found, but dancing ...

Pickled in 'cognac', Chopin's heart gives up its secrets

November 26, 2017
The heart of Frederic Chopin, among the world's most cherished musical virtuosos, may finally have given up the cause of his untimely death.

Sugar industry withheld evidence of sucrose's health effects nearly 50 years ago

November 21, 2017
A U.S. sugar industry trade group appears to have pulled the plug on a study that was producing animal evidence linking sucrose to disease nearly 50 years ago, researchers argue in a paper publishing on November 21 in the ...

Female researchers pay more attention to sex and gender in medicine

November 7, 2017
When women participate in a medical research paper, that research is more likely to take into account the differences between the way men and women react to diseases and treatments, according to a new study by Stanford researchers.

Drug therapy from lethal bacteria could reduce kidney transplant rejection

August 3, 2017
An experimental treatment derived from a potentially deadly microorganism may provide lifesaving help for kidney transplant patients, according to an international study led by investigators at Cedars-Sinai.

Exploring the potential of human echolocation

June 25, 2017
People who are visually impaired will often use a cane to feel out their surroundings. With training and practice, people can learn to use the pitch, loudness and timbre of echoes from the cane or other sounds to navigate ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.