Study suggests laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery appears to be safer than open procedure

June 18, 2012

A study that examined national outcome differences between laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and open Roux-en-Y gastric bypass suggests that the minimally invasive laparoscopic procedure was associated with greater safety and used fewer resources because of shorter hospital stays and less cost, according to a report in the June issue of Archives of Surgery.

A major public health concern, obesity has been associated with such adverse as diabetes, , and some cancers. Bariatric surgery has proven to be an effective option to treat those patients who are morbidly obese, although mortality and other complications are serious risks associated with the procedure, according to the study background.

Gaurav Banka, M.D., and colleagues from the Stanford University School of Medicine, California, used data derived from the 2005-2007 Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS), the largest publicly available, all-payer inpatient database in the United States, to examine the two procedures.

The open Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (ORYGB) group consisted of 41,094 patients and the laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) group consisted of 115,177 patients. The of patients was 42.7 years and the majority of patients were white and female. A higher percentage of ORYGB than LRYGB patients were covered by Medicare (9.3 percent vs. 7.1 percent) and Medicaid (10.4 percent vs. 5.9 percent), according to the study's results.

More ORYGB patients compared with LRYGB patients were discharged with nonroutine dispositions (7.7 percent vs. 2.4 percent), died (0.2 percent vs. 0.1 percent), and had one or more complications (18.7 percent vs. 12.3 percent).

Patients who had ORYGB compared with LRYGB also had longer median lengths of hospital stay (3.5 vs. 2.4 days) and higher total charges ($35,018 vs. $32,671).

"The minimally of LRYGB appears to allow greater safety and lower resource use than ORYGB," the authors conclude. "This large, nationally representative comparison confirms and replicates prior randomized trial evidence supporting the laparoscopic approach, indicating safe dissemination of this technology. For bariatric surgery, patient safety may be further enhanced by appropriate application of the laparoscopic approach."

Explore further: Radiologists play key role in successful bariatric procedures

More information: Arch Surg. 2012;147[6]:550-556

Related Stories

Radiologists play key role in successful bariatric procedures

April 29, 2012
With the increase of obesity in the last 50 years, bariatric surgeries are becoming a common solution for tackling this epidemic. A new exhibit shows how radiologists play a key role in ensuring the success of these procedures.

Number of laparoscopic bariatric procedures continued to rise between 2003-2008

August 8, 2011
According to a study published in the August issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons, there was an increase in the number of laparoscopic bariatric procedures, an increase in the number of bariatric surgeons ...

Recommended for you

One weight-loss surgery shows lasting results

September 21, 2017
(HealthDay)—Obesity surgery can have long-lasting effects on weight and the risk of developing type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure, a new study finds.

Hold the phone: An ambulance might lower your chances of surviving some injuries

September 20, 2017
Victims of gunshots and stabbings are significantly less likely to die if they're taken to the trauma center by a private vehicle than ground emergency medical services (EMS), according to results of a new analysis.

Surgeons have major influence on breast cancer treatment

September 13, 2017
A woman's choice of surgeon plays a significant role in whether she's likely to receive an increasingly popular aggressive breast cancer surgery.

Some thyroid cancer patients can safely delay surgery

September 4, 2017
Most people diagnosed with cancer want to start treatment as soon as possible, for fear that delaying care will allow their tumor to grow out of control.

Obese people lack cells with satiety hormones

August 29, 2017
Individuals with severe overweight have an inhibited sense of satiation - they release fewer satiety hormones than people of normal weight. The reason: the responsible cells in the gastrointestinal tract of obese people are ...

Anesthesia and surgery during infancy may impact white matter during childhood

August 24, 2017
General anesthesia and surgery in otherwise healthy infants under the age of 1 year old could be associated with decreases in the amount of white matter in the brain, as well as reductions in the remaining white matter's ...

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

RamyaSadasivam
not rated yet Jun 18, 2012
Nice to know that at least one procedure could concretely help weight loss.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.