Nomogram developed to estimate early breast cancer survival

June 27, 2012
Nomogram developed to estimate early breast cancer survival
A nomogram has been developed to predict five- and 10-year mastectomy-free survival in older women with early breast cancer and estimate the predicted benefit of radiation therapy following conservative surgery, according to research published online June 25 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

(HealthDay) -- A nomogram has been developed to predict five- and 10-year mastectomy-free survival (MFS) in older women with early breast cancer and estimate the predicted benefit of radiation therapy (RT) following conservative surgery (CS), according to research published online June 25 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

In an effort to develop a to predict five- and 10-year MFS rates with and without RT, Jeffrey M. Albert, M.D., of the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, and colleagues utilized population-based data from 16,092 women aged 66 to 79 years who participated in the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Program.

The researchers found that overall five- and 10-year MFS rates were 98.1 and 95.4 percent, respectively, after a median follow-up period of 7.2 years. Significant predictors of time to mastectomy included age, race, , estrogen receptor status, receipt of radiotherapy, and nodal status. The nomogram developed was able to accurately predict MFS.

"In summary, we used population-based data to develop a nomogram to estimate five- and 10-year MFS among older women with early treated with CS," the authors write. "This clinically useful tool uses readily available clinicopathologic factors to estimate the probability of MFS and can further aid individualized clinical decision making by estimating the potential benefit from RT for this large and growing patient population."

One study author disclosed a financial tie to Varian Medical Systems, which contributed funding to the study.

Explore further: New tool helps identify prostate cancer patients with highest risk of death

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Related Stories

New tool helps identify prostate cancer patients with highest risk of death

October 5, 2011
After a prostate cancer patient receives radiation treatment, his doctor carefully monitors the amount of prostate-specific antigen, or PSA, in his blood. An increase in PSA, called biochemical failure, is the first detectable ...

Young women with early breast cancer have similar survival with breast conservation, mastectomy

September 7, 2011
Young women with early-stage breast cancer have similar survival rates with a lumpectomy and radiation treatment, known as breast-conservation therapy, as with mastectomy, a new study conducted at the University of Maryland ...

Recommended for you

Scientists block the siren call of two aggressive cancers

January 23, 2018
Aggressive cancers like glioblastoma and metastatic breast cancer have in common a siren call that beckons the bone marrow to send along whatever the tumors need to survive and thrive.

Boosting cancer therapy with cross-dressed immune cells

January 22, 2018
Researchers at EPFL have created artificial molecules that can help the immune system to recognize and attack cancer tumors. The study is published in Nature Methods.

Workouts may boost life span after breast cancer

January 22, 2018
(HealthDay)—Longer survival after breast cancer may be as simple as staying fit, new research shows.

Cancer patients who tell their life story find more peace, less depression

January 22, 2018
Fifteen years ago, University of Wisconsin–Madison researcher Meg Wise began interviewing cancer patients nearing the end of life about how they were living with their diagnosis. She was surprised to find that many asked ...

Single blood test screens for eight cancer types

January 18, 2018
Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers developed a single blood test that screens for eight common cancer types and helps identify the location of the cancer.

Researchers find a way to 'starve' cancer

January 18, 2018
Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) have demonstrated for the first time that it is possible to starve a tumor and stop its growth with a newly discovered small compound that blocks uptake of the vital ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.