Improving obesity-induced insulin sensitivity

June 1, 2012

In recent years, a growing body of evidence has linked inflammation to the development of insulin resistance. In insulin resistance, the hormone insulin is less effective in promoting glucose uptake from the bloodstream into other tissues. Obesity is a major factor that contributes to insulin resistance, which can eventually lead to type 2 diabetes. Previous studies have shown that proinflammatory molecules found in fat tissue decreases sensitivity of tissues to insulin.

To identify drug targets that will improve insulin sensitivity, Dr. Jerrold Olefsky and colleagues from the University of California in San Diego investigated the role of G protein-coupled receptor 21 (GPR21) in insulin resistance and energy homeostasis. The group compared mice without the gene encoding GPR21 to healthy control mice under normal and high-fat diet conditions. They discovered that mice lacking GPR21 had enhanced insulin sensitivity and increased energy expenditure independent of diet.

This result was attributed to the reduced migration of inflammatory cells to the liver and fat tissue in the absence GPR21. Under normal diet, absence of GPR21 in the hypothalamus caused a modest decrease in body weight. This is the first study to demonstrate the negative impact of GPR21 on inflammation and . Their findings suggest that GPR21 inhibition may improve and enhance energy expenditure, making GPR21 inhibitors promising treatments for diabetes.

Explore further: Study has shown to reverse obesity, body fat and improve insulin sensitivity in mice

More information: G protein–coupled receptor 21 deletion improves insulin sensitivity in diet-induced obese mice, Journal of Clinical Investigation, 2012.

Related Stories

Study has shown to reverse obesity, body fat and improve insulin sensitivity in mice

April 13, 2012
(Medical Xpress) -- Scientists used the ACE inhibitor captopril (CAP)—commonly used for the treatment of hypertension and cardiac conditions—and found that it can reduce the body weight of mice maintained on a high-fat ...

Tale of 2 mice pinpoints major factor for insulin resistance

May 16, 2011
The road to type 2 diabetes is paved with insulin resistance, a condition often associated with obesity in which the hormone begins to fail at its job helping to convert sugars to energy. Researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center ...

Recommended for you

'Obesity paradox' not found when measuring new cases of cardiovascular disease

December 7, 2017
Although obesity is a well-known risk factor for getting cardiovascular disease, a controversial body of research suggests that obesity may actually be associated with improved survival among people who have cardiovascular ...

Harmful effects of being overweight underestimated

December 1, 2017
The harmful effects of being overweight have been underestimated, according to a new study that analysed body mass index (BMI), health and mortality data in around 60,000 parents and their children, to establish how obesity ...

More than half of US children will have obesity as adults if current trends continue

November 29, 2017
If current trends in child obesity continue, more than 57% of today's children in the U.S. will have obesity at age 35, according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Exercise alone does not lead to weight loss in women—in the medium term

November 23, 2017
Knowing whether or not exercise causes people to lose weight is tricky. When people take up exercise, they often restrict their diet – consciously or unconsciously – and this can mask the effects of the exercise. In our ...

Mindfulness training shows promise for maintaining weight loss

November 23, 2017
Can mindfulness training help overweight people shed pounds and keep them off? McGill University researchers surveyed the growing body of studies investigating that question, and came away encouraged.

Shaming overweight kids only makes things worse

November 20, 2017
(HealthDay)—Overweight kids who are shamed or stigmatized are more likely to binge eat or isolate themselves than to make positive changes such as losing weight, a leading pediatricians' group says.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.